Sŭrnica 2

1 (MM)       And what work did you do in the forest?

and
in
forest sg f def what sg n interr work 2pl impf I nom 2pl
disc

2 (MM)       Was it only the men who went to work up in the forest?

only adv man pl m def
interr clt
hes
go 3pl impf I
in
to
forest sg f def
to
work sg f

3 (a) [0:07]      Well, the men worked. Earlier on they carried [off] lumber to Yundula,

disc
man pl m def
dat refl clt
work 3pl impf I lumber pl m
dat refl clt
drive 3pl impf I
to
Yundula sg f place before

4 (b) [0:09]      They –

nom 3pl

5 (a) [0:10]      in the woods.

around
forest sg f def

6 (b) [0:10]      The women planted saplings.

woman pl f def afforest 3pl impf I

7 (a) [0:11]      And we women planted saplings.

and woman pl f def afforest 1pl impf I

8 (a) [0:13]      I’ve [often] gone out doing such planting. I would go out for planting most of all.

and
nom 1sg
by
afforest vbl.n I
1sg pres aux clt
go sg f L.part I most much def adv
by
afforest vbl.n I go 1sg impf I

9 (a) [0:16]      But in the winter there wasn’t any work. In the winter [you stay] inside,

and
and
winter sg f def
and
pres neg exist work sg f winter sg f def inside adv

10 (a) [0:19]      until you spin up all the flax, do all the weaving, make fabric

until conj spin 2sg pres P flax sg m def until conj weave 2sg pres P until conj
dat refl clt
make 2sg pres P fabric sg n

11 (a) [0:23]      for the children, bleach it in the river, pound it with clubs

for
child pl n def
and
acc n 3sg clt
bleach 2sg pres I
in
river sg f def
and
acc n 3sg clt
pound 2sg pres I
with
bat pl m

12 (a) [0:27]      and then bleach it till it’s soft, till it’s clean,

and
acc n 3sg clt
bleach 2sg pres I
comp
become 3sg pres P soft sg n adj
comp
acc refl clt
cleanse 3sg pres P

13 (a) [0:30]      and all that, then you dry it, so that – that you can dress …

comp
acc refl clt
disc then med adv
acc n 3sg clt
already adv dry 2sg pres P again adv
comp
comp
dress 2sg pres P

14 (b) [0:34]      and they set it aside –

allocate 3pl pres P

15 (a) [0:34]      ... the children.

child pl n def

16 (b) [0:35]      They weave homemade fabric.

weave 3pl pres I domestic sg n adj fabric sg n

17 (MM)       Yes.

yes

18 (a) [0:37]      Homemade fabric. You know? That’s what we were busy with.

domestic sg n adj fabric sg n interr
with
acc n 3sg
acc refl clt
occupy 1pl pres I

19 (b) [0:39]      From flax.

from
flax sg m

20 (MM)       Yes, yes, yes.

yes yes yes

21 (a) [0:39]      Because the women [worked] the flax.

because woman pl f def flax sg m def

22 (MM)       So flax grew here. It took root here.

mean 3sg pres I flax sg m def
3sg pres aux clt
become sg m L.part I here adv bear sg m L.part I
acc refl clt
3sg pres aux clt

23 (a) [0:43]      It did, it did.

become 3sg impf I become 3sg impf I

24 (MM)       It grew [here].

bear sg m L.part I
acc refl clt
3sg pres aux clt

25 (a) [0:44]      Really nice flax grew here.

very adv nice sg m adj flax sg m become 3sg impf I

26 (MM)       Do you still plant it? Or not?

disc
now adv already adv put 2pl pres I
interr clt
no

27 (b) [0:47]      Nope.

no

28 (a) [0:47]      Well now – up till now, you know, things were different –

disc now adv
to
now adv interr 3sg impf cop other sg n adj time sg n def

29 (MM)       Yes.

yes

30 (a) [0:49]      state-owned. And now – from now on [someone should] develop it for the future.

state sg n adj
and
now adv from.now adv onward adv
and
hort
acc n 3sg clt
develop 3pl pres P from.here adv onward adv

31 (MM)       Yes.

yes

32 (a) [0:54]      Some people will [certainly] start to sow it again.

fut begin 3pl pres P someone sg m again adv
comp
sow 3pl pres I

33 (MM)       Yes. And wool – how do you process that?

yes
and
wool sg f def how interr
acc f 3sg clt
do 2pl pres I nom 2pl

34 (a) [1:00]      Wool?

wool sg f def
interr clt

35 (MM)       Yes.

yes

36 (a) [1:01]      Well, you know, you take it to the cauldron, to …

interr there adv take 2sg pres P cauldron sg m def
to

37 (b) [1:03]      To the river.

to
river sg f def

38 (a) [1:03]      … to the trough there, to the washing place and you steam it.

to
trough sg n def there adv
to
washing.place sg f def
and
steam 2sg pres P
acc f 3sg clt

39 (MM)       Right.

thus adv

40 (a) [1:08]      One fleece at a time, from a single sheep.

by
one sg n adj fleece sg n
from
one sg f adj sheep sg f

41 (MM)       Ah, and why do you steam it?

disc
why interr
acc f 3sg clt
steam 2sg pres I

42 (a) [1:10]      [We put] a sack [of wool] to boil in the cauldron to get rid of the “sera”

one sg m adj sack sg m
comp
boil 3sg pres I
in
cauldron sg m def grease sg f def
comp
emerge 3sg pres P

43 (MM)       Ah – the “sera”?

excl
grease sg f def

44 (a) [1:14]      The grease. You steam the wool like that so the “sera” (grease) will come out,

grease sg f def
comp
emerge 3sg pres P grease sg f def
of
wool sg f def steam 2sg pres P
acc f 3sg clt
disc

45 (a) [1:19]      After that you throw it into the cold trough again …

after this sg n med adj
acc f 3sg clt
throw 2sg pres I
in
cold sg n def adj trough sg n again adv

46 (b) [1:22]      You wash this –

wash 2sg pres I this sg n adj

47 (a) [1:23]      so it gets all washed through again.

again adv there adv
comp
acc refl clt
wash 3sg pres P

48 (MM)       Yes.

yes

49 (a) [1:25]      And after that you put another fleece from [another] sheep in the cauldron.

after this sg n med adj put 2sg pres I again adv other sg n adj fleece sg n
from
sheep sg f
in
cauldron sg m def

50 (a) [1:28]      Whether ten or twenty fleeces of wool, they all

and
have 2sg pres I ten
and
have 2sg pres I twenty fleece pl n wool sg f
and
all pl adj

51 (a) [1:32]      get done one by one. You process them [all] in hot water

one sg n adj
by
one sg n adj fut
acc 3pl clt
put 2sg pres P
in
hot sg f def adj water sg f
in
cauldron sg m def

52 (a) [1:37]      and after that you wash them in cold water

and
after this sg n med adj already adv
in
cold sg f def adj water sg f fut
acc 3pl clt
wash 2sg pres I

53 (a) [1:40]      as much as you want.

how.much rel
dat refl clt
want 2sg pres I

54 (MM)       Yes. And [what] about the dyeing?

yes
and
for
dye def vbl.n I

55 (a) [1:49]      For the dyeing you get dyes from gypsy women, and we [also] get lemon salt

for
dye def vbl.n I
dat refl clt
take 3sg pres P dye sg f
from
gypsy.woman pl f def
and
lemon.salt indcl
dat refl clt
take 1pl pres I

56 (a) [1:55]      Again you set the cauldron up here in the yard, and you dye them.

again adv
dat refl clt
put 2sg pres P cauldron sg m def here adv
in
yard sg m def
and
dat refl clt
acc 3pl clt
dye 2sg pres P

57 (MM)       The –

in
hes

58 (a) [1:58]      [You dye] the yarn [to be] whatever [color] you want.

what.kind sg f rel adj yarn sg f want 2sg pres I

59 (MM)       Ah, it’s the yarn that you dye.

disc
yarn sg f def dye 2sg pres I

60 (a) [2:00]      It’s the yarn we dye. Green, or blue, or red, or orange, whatever [you want].

yarn sg f def dye 1pl pres I green sg f adj
interr clt
blue sg f adj
interr clt
red sg f adj
interr clt
orange sg f adj
interr clt

61 (b) [2:05]      One at a time.

to
one sg n adj
to
one sg n def adj

62 (a) [2:06]      Whatever [color] of yarn you want, you fix up the cauldron [again] and dye it.

what.kind sg f rel adj want 2sg pres I yarn sg f put 2sg pres I cauldron sg m def dye 2sg pres I

63 (a) [2:09]      You dye one, take it out, dye the next, and [that’s how] we do the dyeing.

dye 2sg pres P one sg f def adj remove 2sg pres P
acc f 3sg clt
dye 2sg pres P other sg f adj again adv dye 1pl pres I
dat refl clt

64 (b) [2:14]      And they used to dye with “kamenyok” (lichen) too.

and
with
lichen sg m dye 3pl impf I again adv

65 (MM)       What?

how interr

66 (a) [2:16]      And when the weather is rainy we go out and gather “kamenyok” from rocks.

and
when conj precipitate 3sg pres I weather sg n def again adv go 1pl pres P gather 1pl pres P lichen sg m
from
stone pl m def

67 (MM)       What is this “kamenyok”?

what sg n interr
3sg pres cop clt
this sg n adj lichen sg m

68 (b) [2:20]      It’s the same as mallow [grass], [but taken] off of rocks.

from
stone pl m def also adv like mallow sg m such sg n med adj

69 (a) [2:20]      On top of a rock, “kamenyok”.

on stone sg m def lichen sg m

70 (b) [2:22]      It grows on rocks.

grow 3sg pres I
to
stone pl m def such sg n med adj

71 (a) [2:24]      It’s sort of like a crust on top of the rock,

pres exist something sg n like crust sg f thus med adv on stone sg m def

72 (b) [2:27]      [Like] ash.

ash sg f

73 (a) [2:27]      and we peel it off.

peel 1pl pres P peel 1pl pres P

74 (MM)       Ah! That [thing you find] on rocks! So –

excl
this sg n adj
by
stone sg m def
hes

75 (a) [2:30]      And - what?

and
disc

76 (b) [2:31]      dà

yes

77 (MM)       And that’s what you call “kamenyok”?

and
this sg n adj
dat m 3sg clt
call 2pl pres I lichen sg m

78 (b) [2:32]      “Kamenyok”, yes.

lichen sg m yes

79 (a) [2:32]      [We call] it “kamenyok” because it comes from a rock (“kamŭk”).

and
to
acc m 3sg lichen sg m because
from
stone sg m

80 (MM)       And what color is that?

and
which sg m adj color sg m
3sg pres cop clt
nom n 3sg

81 (a) [2:35]      Well, sort of gray. Ah, here, like [your] trousers.

disc
such sg m med adj like gray sg m def something sg n
ost
like trousers sg m def

82 (MM)       Yes.

yes

83 (a) [2:39]      A little grayish. That sort of color, gray.

little adv
in
gray sg n adj such sg m med adj
3sg pres cop clt
color sg m def

84 (MM)       Yes.

yes

85 (a) [2:43]      Gray.

gray sg n adj

86 (MM)       Aha. I hadn’t heard that [word].

excl this sg n adj
neg
1sg pres aux clt hear sg m L.part I

87 (a) [2:45]      We pick the lichen. We pick it …

pluck 1pl pres P lichen sg m pluck 1pl pres P

88 (b) [2:45]      They also [make] dye from bark.

and
with
bark pl f dye 3pl pres I

89 (a) [2:46]      … and boil it up in the cauldron. We boil it, take it out, get it out,

boil 1pl pres P
acc m 3sg clt
acc m 3sg in
cauldron sg m def boil 1pl pres P extract 2sg pres P acc m 3sg remove 2sg pres P

90 (a) [2:49]      put in the yarn, and put the lichen [back in] on top of that …

put 2sg pres P yarn sg f def put 2sg pres P
and
lichen sg m def atop adv still

91 (b) [2:53]      … and from bark.

and
with
bark pl f

92 (a) [2:53]      … and you keep it [there for a while] –

and
acc m 3sg clt
hold 2sg pres I

93 (b) [2:54]      They dyed [things] brown with bark.

and
with
bark pl f dye 3pl impf I brown sg n adj

94 (a) [2:55]      Bark from fir trees.

and
fir pl adj bark pl f again adv

95 (MM)       Ah, fir bark.

excl
fir pl adj bark pl f

96 (a) [3:57]      You pick bark off a fir tree. [Yes,] we also dye [things] with fir bark.

from
fir sg f again adv fut pluck 2sg pres P bark sg f again adv with
fir sg f bark sg f again adv dye 1pl pres I

97 (MM)       Yes.

yes

98 (b) [3:02]      Bro–

[…]

99 (a) [3:03]      [From a] fir tree.

fir sg f

100 (b) [3:03]      They dye [things] brown.

brown sg n adj dye 3pl pres I

101 (MM)       Huh.

bkch

102 (a) [3:05]      There’s [some] over there, my sense is that there is some,

pres exist there adv hunch sg n def
dat 1sg clt
3sg pres cop clt
comp
acc f 3sg clt
pres exist

103 (a) [3:06]      but I don’t know where it is any more.

but
neg
know 1sg pres I where interr
3sg pres cop clt
already adv

104 (MM)       So women did their own dyeing here …

mean 3sg pres I woman pl f def
dat refl clt
dye 3pl impf I here adv

105 (a) [3:13]      Oho, did they do the dyeing!

dye 3pl impf I
dat refl clt
excl

106 (MM)       They didn’t – they didn’t take it other places to have it dyed for them.

hes
neg
give 3pl impf I
to
other pl adj place pl n
comp
dat 3pl clt
acc refl clt
dye 3sg pres I

107 (b) [3:16]      No, there was no such thing then.

no no then med adv impf neg exist

108 (a) [3:16]      No.

no

109 (MM)       In other villages they take [things] out to the dye-works.

to
other pl adj village pl n take 3pl pres I
about
dye.works pl f

110 (a) [3:17]      At that time there wasn’t anywhere to [take things] to dye. Even now we dye our own,

impf neg exist then med adv nowhere adv where interr
comp
dye 2sg pres I but
and
now adv
dat refl clt
dye 1pl pres I

111 (b) [3:20]      Yes.

yes

112 (a) [3:20]      And when you feel like it, and when you have time,

and
when rel
dat refl clt
dat 2sg clt
come 3sg pres P
and
when rel
dat refl clt
have 2sg pres I time sg n

113 (a) [3:23]      you’ll still do your own dyeing.

again adv fut
dat refl clt
dye 2sg pres I

114 (MM)       Yes, yes, yes.

yes yes yes

115 (a) [3:25]      Where are you going to go? In the old days there wasn’t anywhere to go.

where interr
comp
go 2sg pres P
at
one sg n adj time sg n neg exist where interr neg exist where interr
comp
go 2sg pres P

116 (a) [3:28]      Who would dye for you, and where? Fortunately some dyers would come by

which sg m interr
comp
dat 2sg clt
dye 3sg pres P
and
from.where adv good adv pass 3pl impf I thus med adv dyer pl m

117 (b) [3:32]      And they bring the dyes.

and
bring 3pl pres I dye pl f

118 (a) [3:32]      Gypsy women, other [groups], a third [group], you’d get dye [from them], you do the dyeing

gypsy.woman pl f other pl adj third.group pl adj
and
take 2sg pres I dye sg f
and
dat refl clt
dye 2sg pres I

119 (a) [3:35]      and make something so you’ve got [clothes] to wear.

and
dat refl clt
make 2sg pres P something sg n
comp
dat refl clt
pres exist
comp
acc refl clt
dress 2sg pres P

120 (MM)       Yes, yes, yes, yes.

yes yes yes yes

121 (a) [3:39]      We’d make “aba” (coarse homespun). Yes, [it’s] from the black wool

domestic pl adj felt pl f
dat refl clt
make 1pl impf I black pl def adj wool pl f
dat refl clt
again adv

122 (a) [3:42]      [that] coarse homespun is made, and [from that] trousers for the men.

make sg f P.part I felt sg f domestic sg f adj
for
man pl m def trouser pl m

123 (b) [3:44]      For trousers.

for
trouser sg m

124 (MM)       Right.

thus adv

125 (a) [3:46]      Ah –

disc

126 (b) [3:46]      From black wool.

with
black sg f adj wool sg f

127 (a) [3:47]      I wouldn’t buy [any] from the store. Where would I find it? Nowhere!

impf neg exist
comp
buy 1sg pres P
from
store sg m def from.where adv fut find 1sg pres P pres neg exist from.where adv

128 (a) [3:51]      You’d get yourself in gear, spin it fine on the spinning wheel, spin it,

and fasten sg imv I
acc refl clt
again adv spin sg imv I
to
spinning.wheel sg m def thin adv spin sg imv I

129 (a) [3:54]      glue it – steam it again with flour so the homespun won’t tear.

glue sg imv I again adv steam 2sg pres P with
flour sg n felt sg f def
comp
neg
acc refl clt tear 3sg pres I

130 (b) [3:58]      If it gets cracks [in it].

when conj
acc refl clt
crack 3sg pres P

131 (a) [3:59]      On each layer [you put] a handful of flour – rye flour,

this sg n med adj
at
each sg m adj row sg m
by
one f sg adj handful sg f flour sg n rye sg n adj flour sg n

132 (a) [4:02]      made from rye. You stir it up like porridge, you stir and stir,

from
rye sg f def stir 2sg pres P like porridge sg f stir 2sg pres P stir 2sg pres P

133 (a) [4:06]      and then pour it into the water. And [then] you put the yarn to soak…

and
acc n 3sg clt
pour 2sg pres P in
water sg f def
and
soak 2sg pres P yarn pl f def

134 (MM)       Right –

thus adv

135 (a) [4:10]      … so that it gets a little stiff. And then you put it on the warp

little adv
comp
harden 3sg pres P
and
after this sg n med adj
acc n 3sg clt
put 2sg pres I acc n 3sg
for
warp sg f

136 (a) [4:13]      and the other [= non-stiffened yarn] you weave as the woof.

and
other sg n def adj again adv weave 2sg pres I
for
woof sg m

137 (a) [4:16]      [In my time] I would weave forty or fifty meters of coarse black homespun at a time

by
forty
by
fifty meter ct m 1sg pres aux clt weave sg f L.part I domestic sg f adj felt sg f black sg f adj

138 (MM)       Huh.

bkch

139 (a) [4:20]      All [of them] were –

all indcl 3pl impf cop all pl def adj

140 (b) [4:21]      Umhm [that’s right]

disc

141 (a) [4:21]      – [all] our men’s trousers [were] made out of it.

male pl def adj our pl def adj trousers pl m

142 (a) [4:22]      Well, what [else] are you going to do?

disc
what sg n interr
fut
do 2sg pres I

143 (a) [4:23]      At that time only the Tramp folk here – there were the old-fashioned "shivachi" (tailors) –

then med adv Trampite pl name only adv here adv one pl adj people pl impf exist old.time pl adj tailor pl m

144 (b) [4:26]      A "terzija” (tailor).

tailor sg m

145 (a) [4:27]      Right, the "terzija" Tramposki. People went there to have [the trousers] sewn.

disc tailor sg m def Trampuski sg m name there adv go 3pl impf I
comp
acc 3pl clt
sew 3pl pres I

146 (b) [4:29]      Uh huh.

bkch

147 (a) [4:31]      Ah, we suffered a lot in the old days. A lot.

disc
suffer 1pl impf I
acc refl clt
much adv
at
time sg n def much adv

148 (MM)       But you were able to do everything [for yourselves].

but
everything sg n adj
2pl pres aux clt
can pl L.part I
comp
do 2pl pres I

149 (a) [4:36]      Yes, we can. And even now I – even now if the occasion came up,

disc
can 1pl pres I
and
now adv
dat 1sg clt
now adv
comp
dat 1sg clt
acc refl clt
give 3sg pres P

150 (a) [4:39]      I would do it myself.

and
now adv
fut
dat refl clt
do 1sg pres I

151 (MM)       Yes.

yes

152 (a) [4:40]      All those instruments sit there, they’re all there for you,

all pl def adj instruments pl m
dat refl clt
sit 3pl pres I everything sg n adj dat refl clt
dat 2sg clt
sit 3sg pres I

153 (a) [4:42]      you can do it.

and
can pres imprs
comp
acc n 3sg clt
do sg pres I

154 (b) [4:44]      [laughter]

155 (a) [4:45]      The times push [you]. I tell you, what can you do?

time sg n def drive 3sg pres I what sg n interr
comp
do sg pres I
comp
dat 2sg clt
say 1sg pres P

156 (a) [4:48]      Time itself pushes you: it leads you [forward].

push 3sg pres I very sg n def adj time sg n
dat refl clt
acc 2sg clt
lead 3sg pres I

157 (MM)       That’s exactly right. Just so.

exactly adv thus adv
3sg pres cop clt
exactly adv thus adv

158 (a) [4:50]      It leads you [forward].

lead 3sg pres I
dat refl clt
acc 2sg clt

159 (MM)       So. And didn’t – didn’t you take the homespun to the “valyavitsa” (fuller)?

O.K. adv felt sg f def
neg
3sg pres cop clt
to
fulling.mill sg f
neg
[...]

160 (a) [4:54]      We take it to Dospat.

carry 1pl pres I
acc f 3sg clt
again adv in
Dospat sg m place

161 (MM)       [Ah], there was [one] there.

there adv exist impf

162 (a) [4:56]      There is. We call it “tupavitsa”.

pres exist fulling.mill sg f
dat m 3sg clt
call 1pl pres I

163 (b) [4:57]      “Tupavitsa”.

fulling.mill sg f

164 (MM)       Ah, “tupavitsa”. Ahh.

disc
fulling.mill sg f
disc

165 (a) [4:58]      Down to the "tupavitsa" (fuller). That’s where they also full

fulling.mill sg f ost now adv there adv
acc f 3sg clt
full 3pl pres I
and

166 (a) [5:01]      homemade bags. We weave smaller homemade bags, also out of woolen.

domestic pl adj bag pl f
dat refl clt
weave 1pl pres I bag pl f domestic pl adj woolen pl adj again adv

167 (MM)       Ah?!

excl

168 (a) [5:05]      Like these trousers here, multicolored.

ost
thus med adv like trousers sg m def dapple sg n P.part P

169 (b) [5:07]      Multicolored.

multicolored sg n adj

170 (MM)       Uh huh, uh huh.

bkch bkch bkch

171 (b) [5:08]      Black and white.

white sg n adj
and
black sg n adj

172 (a) [5:09]      Black and white, whichever suits you.

white sg n adj
and
black sg n adj which sg n rel adj
dat 2sg clt
suit 3sg pres P

173 (MM)       And there were those colors too.

and
[...]
such pl adj color pl m 3pl impf cop

174 (b) [5:12]      Yes.

yes

175 (a) [5:12]      Bags of those colors.

such pl med adj color pl m bag pl f

176 (b) [5:13]      They didn’t use any others.

other pl adj neg put 3pl impf I

177 (a) [5:15]      And you weave up black and white coarse homespun [for] bags

and
weave 2sg pres P
dat refl clt
felt pl f def white sg f def adj black sg f def adj bag pl f def

178 (a) [5:18]      and then it’s off to Dospat. You take them down there on horseback

hort
and
to
Dospat sg m place
with
horse sg m def fut
acc 3pl clt
drive 2sg pres P there adv

179 (a) [5:22]      for them to full them, for them to – do them up

comp
acc 3pl clt
full 3pl pres P
comp
acc 3pl clt
full 3pl pres P
comp
acc 3pl clt
[ ... ]
arrange 3pl pres P

180 (a) [5:24]      and then you take them back again …

and
dat refl clt
acc 3pl clt
take 2sg pres I again adv back adv

181 (b) [5:25]      So you can work –

comp
can pres imprs
comp
work 2sg pres I

182 (a) [5:26]      … for them to full them.

comp
acc 3pl clt
full 3pl pres P

183 (b) [5:27]      They dry them up nicely so you can –

dry 3pl pres I nicely adv
comp
can pres imprs

184 (MM)       Yes, yes, yes, yes.

yes yes yes yes

185 (a) [5:29]      And then you bring them here and stretch them out on oak beams.

and
and then med adv here adv bring 3pl pres P again adv
acc 3pl clt
stretch 2sg pres P with
beech sg n adj wood sg n

186 (MM)       Right –

thus adv

187 (a) [5:32]      You hang them up along the balcony or down the side of the house – wherever comes first …

hang 2sg pres P
acc 3pl clt
along
balcony sg f def down adv
or
along
house sg f def where interr come 3sg pres P

188 (b) [5:36]      [With] weights so they’ll stretch –

weight sg f
comp
acc refl clt
stretch 3pl pres P

189 (a) [5:36]      … and you stretch them out [with] weights –

and
stretch 2sg pres P weight sg f

190 (MM)       Right –

thus adv

191 (b) [5:38]      So the coarse homespun will stretch out ...

felt sg f def
comp
acc refl clt
stretch 3sg pres P

192 (MM)       The coarse homespun.

felt sg f

193 (a) [5:39]      With weights so the homespun will sag ...

with
weight sg f
comp
can 3sg pres I
hes
sag 3sg pres P felt sg f def

194 (b) [5:40]      ... so it’ll get thinner.

and
comp
acc refl clt
thin.out 3sg pres P

195 (a) [5:41]      and get thin, so it will stretch out

comp
become 3sg pres P thin sg f adj
comp
become 3sg pres P stretch sg f P.part P

196 (a) [5:44]      so that the tailor can sew it better –

comp
comp
can 3sg pres I
comp
sew 3sg pres I tailor sg m def more nicely adv

197 (a) [5:46]      so it can be sewn up nicely,

disc
comp
dat m 3sg clt
acc refl clt
sew 3sg pres I nicely adv

198 (MM)       And –

[ ... ]

199 (a) [5:48]      otherwise it’ll be rough-edged, all wrinkled.

otherwise adv become 3sg pres I angular sg f adj become 3sg pres I
to
wrinkle pl f

200 (MM)       Yes, yes.

yes
yes

201 (a) [5:51]      But this way it gets to be fully stretched out and smooth.

and
thus med adv dense adv stretch sg f P.part P smooth sg f adj become 3sg pres P thus med adv

202 (RA)       Hmm.

bkch

203 (a) [5:54]      In the old days there weren’t irons or [anything] you could iron with.

one sg n adj
time sg n impf neg exist iron pl f
with
what sg n rel
comp
acc refl clt
iron 3pl pres I

204 (a) [5:57]      Whether or not trousers got wrinkled, you’ll deal with it

trousers sg m def interr
3sg pres cop clt
wrinkle sg m P.part P interr neg fut adapt 2sg pres I

205 (a) [6:00]      and [just] move on. No [other] way.

fut walk 2sg pres I neg exist manner sg m

206 (MM)       Hey you! That’s too much noise!

excl much adv noise sg m
adrs

207 (a) [6:02]      What can you do. [Hey] kids!

fut walk 2sg pres I child pl n

         And what work did you do in the forest?


         Was it only the men who went to work up in the forest?


         Well, the men worked. Earlier on they carried [off] lumber to Yundula,


         They –


         in the woods.


         The women planted saplings.


         And we women planted saplings.


         I’ve [often] gone out doing such planting. I would go out for planting most of all.


         But in the winter there wasn’t any work. In the winter [you stay] inside,


         for the children, bleach it in the river, pound it with clubs


         and then bleach it till it’s soft, till it’s clean,


         and all that, then you dry it, so that – that you can dress …


         and they set it aside –


         ... the children.


         They weave homemade fabric.


         Yes.


         Homemade fabric. You know? That’s what we were busy with.


         From flax.


         Yes, yes, yes.


         Because the women [worked] the flax.


         So flax grew here. It took root here.


         It did, it did.


         It grew [here].


         Really nice flax grew here.


         Do you still plant it? Or not?


         Nope.


         Well now – up till now, you know, things were different –


         Yes.


         state-owned. And now – from now on [someone should] develop it for the future.


         Yes.


         Some people will [certainly] start to sow it again.


         Yes. And wool – how do you process that?


         Yes.


         Well, you know, you take it to the cauldron, to …


         To the river.


         … to the trough there, to the washing place and you steam it.


         Right.


         One fleece at a time, from a single sheep.


         Ah, and why do you steam it?


         [We put] a sack [of wool] to boil in the cauldron to get rid of the “sera”


         Ah – the “sera”?


         The grease. You steam the wool like that so the “sera” (grease) will come out,


         After that you throw it into the cold trough again …


         You wash this –


         so it gets all washed through again.


         Yes.


         And after that you put another fleece from [another] sheep in the cauldron.


         Whether ten or twenty fleeces of wool, they all


         as much as you want.


         Yes. And [what] about the dyeing?


         For the dyeing you get dyes from gypsy women, and we [also] get lemon salt


         Again you set the cauldron up here in the yard, and you dye them.


         The –


         [You dye] the yarn [to be] whatever [color] you want.


         Ah, it’s the yarn that you dye.


         It’s the yarn we dye. Green, or blue, or red, or orange, whatever [you want].


         One at a time.


         Whatever [color] of yarn you want, you fix up the cauldron [again] and dye it.


         You dye one, take it out, dye the next, and [that’s how] we do the dyeing.


         And they used to dye with “kamenyok” (lichen) too.


         What?


         And when the weather is rainy we go out and gather “kamenyok” from rocks.


         What is this “kamenyok”?


         It’s the same as mallow [grass], [but taken] off of rocks.


         On top of a rock, “kamenyok”.


         It grows on rocks.


         It’s sort of like a crust on top of the rock,


         [Like] ash.


         and we peel it off.


         Ah! That [thing you find] on rocks! So –


         And - what?


         dà


         And that’s what you call “kamenyok”?


         “Kamenyok”, yes.


         [We call] it “kamenyok” because it comes from a rock (“kamŭk”).


         And what color is that?


         Well, sort of gray. Ah, here, like [your] trousers.


         Yes.


         A little grayish. That sort of color, gray.


         Yes.


         Gray.


         Aha. I hadn’t heard that [word].


         We pick the lichen. We pick it …


         They also [make] dye from bark.


         … and boil it up in the cauldron. We boil it, take it out, get it out,


         put in the yarn, and put the lichen [back in] on top of that …


         … and from bark.


         … and you keep it [there for a while] –


         They dyed [things] brown with bark.


         Bark from fir trees.


         Ah, fir bark.


         You pick bark off a fir tree. [Yes,] we also dye [things] with fir bark.


         Yes.


         Bro–


         [From a] fir tree.


         They dye [things] brown.


         Huh.


         There’s [some] over there, my sense is that there is some,


         but I don’t know where it is any more.


         So women did their own dyeing here …


         Oho, did they do the dyeing!


         They didn’t – they didn’t take it other places to have it dyed for them.


         No, there was no such thing then.


         No.


         In other villages they take [things] out to the dye-works.


         At that time there wasn’t anywhere to [take things] to dye. Even now we dye our own,


         Yes.


         And when you feel like it, and when you have time,


         you’ll still do your own dyeing.


         Yes, yes, yes.


         Where are you going to go? In the old days there wasn’t anywhere to go.


         Who would dye for you, and where? Fortunately some dyers would come by


         And they bring the dyes.


         Gypsy women, other [groups], a third [group], you’d get dye [from them], you do the dyeing


         and make something so you’ve got [clothes] to wear.


         Yes, yes, yes, yes.


         We’d make “aba” (coarse homespun). Yes, [it’s] from the black wool


         [that] coarse homespun is made, and [from that] trousers for the men.


         For trousers.


         Right.


         Ah –


         From black wool.


         I wouldn’t buy [any] from the store. Where would I find it? Nowhere!


         You’d get yourself in gear, spin it fine on the spinning wheel, spin it,


         glue it – steam it again with flour so the homespun won’t tear.


         If it gets cracks [in it].


         made from rye. You stir it up like porridge, you stir and stir,


         and then pour it into the water. And [then] you put the yarn to soak…


         Right –


         … so that it gets a little stiff. And then you put it on the warp


         and the other [= non-stiffened yarn] you weave as the woof.


         [In my time] I would weave forty or fifty meters of coarse black homespun at a time


         Huh.


         All [of them] were –


         Umhm [that’s right]


         – [all] our men’s trousers [were] made out of it.


         Well, what [else] are you going to do?


         At that time only the Tramp folk here – there were the old-fashioned "shivachi" (tailors) –


         A "terzija” (tailor).


         Right, the "terzija" Tramposki. People went there to have [the trousers] sewn.


         Uh huh.


         Ah, we suffered a lot in the old days. A lot.


         But you were able to do everything [for yourselves].


         Yes, we can. And even now I – even now if the occasion came up,


         I would do it myself.


         Yes.


         All those instruments sit there, they’re all there for you,


         [laughter]


         The times push [you]. I tell you, what can you do?


         Time itself pushes you: it leads you [forward].


         That’s exactly right. Just so.


         It leads you [forward].


         So. And didn’t – didn’t you take the homespun to the “valyavitsa” (fuller)?


         We take it to Dospat.


         [Ah], there was [one] there.


         There is. We call it “tupavitsa”.


         “Tupavitsa”.


         Ah, “tupavitsa”. Ahh.


         Down to the "tupavitsa" (fuller). That’s where they also full


         homemade bags. We weave smaller homemade bags, also out of woolen.


         Ah?!


         Like these trousers here, multicolored.


         Multicolored.


         Uh huh, uh huh.


         Black and white.


         Black and white, whichever suits you.


         And there were those colors too.


         Yes.


         Bags of those colors.


         They didn’t use any others.


         And you weave up black and white coarse homespun [for] bags


         and then it’s off to Dospat. You take them down there on horseback


         for them to full them, for them to – do them up


         and then you take them back again …


         So you can work –


         … for them to full them.


         They dry them up nicely so you can –


         Yes, yes, yes, yes.


         And then you bring them here and stretch them out on oak beams.


         Right –


         You hang them up along the balcony or down the side of the house – wherever comes first …


         [With] weights so they’ll stretch –


         … and you stretch them out [with] weights –


         Right –


         So the coarse homespun will stretch out ...


         The coarse homespun.


         With weights so the homespun will sag ...


         ... so it’ll get thinner.


         and get thin, so it will stretch out


          so that the tailor can sew it better –


          so it can be sewn up nicely,


         And –


         otherwise it’ll be rough-edged, all wrinkled.


         Yes, yes.


         But this way it gets to be fully stretched out and smooth.


         Hmm.


         In the old days there weren’t irons or [anything] you could iron with.


         Whether or not trousers got wrinkled, you’ll deal with it


         and [just] move on. No [other] way.


         Hey you! That’s too much noise!


         What can you do. [Hey] kids!


1 (MM)       а във гора̀та какво̀ рабо̀техте вѝе тə

2 (MM)       са̀мо мъжѐте ли нə хо̀деха в нə гора̀та на ра̀бота

3 (a) [0:07]       ами мәж’ѐте си рәбо̀теhә тру̀п’е си ка̀рәhә в ѝндулә напрѐш

4 (b) [0:09]       т’ѐ

5 (a) [0:10]       пу гуръ̀тә

6 (b) [0:10]       ж’енѝте зәлес’а̀вәhә

7 (a) [0:11]       пәк ж’енѝте зәлес’е̂̀вәhме

8 (a) [0:13]       и йе̂̀с пу зәлес’а̀вәне сә о̀д’елә нъ̀й мно̀гуту пу зәлес’а̀вәне о̀деh

9 (a) [0:16]       а пә зѝмәтә па н’е̂̀мә ра̀бутә зѝмәтә въ̀тре

10 (a) [0:19]       дуд’ѐ пуупр’әд’ѐш’ л’әнъ̀ дуд’ѐ пуутәч’ѐш’ дуд’ѐ си нәпра̀виш’ пла̀тну

11 (a) [0:23]       нә деца̀тә пә гу б’е̂̀лиш’ нә река̀тә па гу ч’у̀кәш с ко̀пәни

12 (a) [0:27]       пә гу б’е̂̀лиш’ дә ста̀не м’ъ̀ку дә сә иш’ч’ѝстә

13 (a) [0:30]       дә сә тәко̀әнә туга̀в гу в’ѐч’ә исуш’ѝш’ па̀ дә дә убл’әч’ѐш’

14 (b) [0:34]       задел’ъ̀т

15 (a) [0:34]       дәца̀тә

16 (b) [0:35]       тəкъ̀т дума̀шну плəтно̀

17 (MM)       да̀

18 (a) [0:37]       дума̀шну пла̀тну лѐ с н’ѐгу сә зәнима̀вәме

19 (b) [0:39]       уд л’ѐн

20 (MM)       да̀ да̀ да̀

21 (a) [0:39]       о̀ти ж’енѝте л’әнъ̀

22 (MM)       зна̀чи ленъ̀ е ста̀вал ту̀ка ра̀ждал се е

23 (a) [0:43]       ста̀вәш’е ста̀вәш’е

24 (MM)       ра̀ждал се е

25 (a) [0:44]       мно̀гу у̀бәф л’ъ̀н ста̀вәш’е

26 (MM)       а сега̀ вѐче сла̀гате ли нѐ

27 (b) [0:47]       əˀə

28 (a) [0:47]       әми сига̀ ду сига̀ нәлѝ бәше дру̀гу вр’е̂̀мету

29 (MM)       да

30 (a) [0:49]       дәржа̀вну и с’а̀ утс’а̀ нәта̀тәк пә нѐкә гу рәзрәбо̀т’ет утту̀к нәта̀тәк

31 (MM)       да̀

32 (a) [0:54]       ш’и по̀чнәт не̂̀куй па̀ дә сейъ̀т

33 (MM)       да̀ а въ̀лната ка̀к йа рабо̀тите вѝе

34 (a) [1:00]       въ̀лнәта̀ ли

35 (MM)       да̀

36 (a) [1:01]       нәлѝ та̀м уднис’ѐш’ кәза̀нә нә

37 (b) [1:03]       нә река̀тә

38 (a) [1:03]       нә курѝтуту та̀мкәнә нә пира̀лнәтә и пупа̀риш’ йə

39 (MM)       така

40 (a) [1:08]       пу йно̀ ру̀ну уд ина̀ уфца̀

41 (MM)       е зашто̀ йа попа̀рваш

42 (a) [1:10]       идѝн ч’ува̀л дә врѝ ф кәза̀нә с’әръ̀тә дә излез’ѐ

43 (MM)       а̀ серъ̀та

44 (a) [1:14]       мәзнинъ̀тә дә излəз’ѐ серъ̀тә нә въ̀лнәтә пупа̀риш’ йә тәко̀әнә

45 (a) [1:19]       сл’ѐт тва̀ йә фъ̀рл’әш’ ф студ’ѐнуту курѝту па̀

46 (b) [1:22]       измѝвәш то̀о

47 (a) [1:23]       па̀ та̀м дә сә испир’ѐ

48 (MM)       да

49 (a) [1:25]       сл’әт тва̀ сла̀гәш’ па̀г дру̀гу ру̀ну уд уфцъ̀ ф кәза̀нә

50 (a) [1:28]       мә ѝмәж д’ѐсет мә ѝмәж два̀йси руна̀ въ̀лнә и сѝч’ки

51 (a) [1:32]       иднѝч’ку пу иднѝч’ку ш’ә ги прика̀рәш’ в гур’ъ̀штәтә во̀дә ф кәза̀нә

52 (a) [1:37]       и сл’әт тва̀ в’ѐч’ә ф студ’ѐнәтә во̀дә ш’ә ги пир’ѐш’

53 (a) [1:40]       ко̀лку си ѝскәш’

54 (MM)       да̀ а за бойадѝсванету

55 (a) [1:49]       зә буедѝсвәнету си зѝмме буйъ̀ ут цѝгәнкѝте и лимо̀нтузу̀ си зѝмәме

56 (a) [1:55]       па̀к си сло̀ж’иш’ кәза̀нә ту̀к нә дво̀рә и си ги буедѝсәш’

57 (MM)       на ә

58 (a) [1:58]       ква̀ пр’ѐж’дә ѝскәш’

59 (MM)       а̀ прѐждата бойадѝсваш

60 (a) [2:00]       пр’ѐж’дәтә буедѝсвәме зел’ѐнә ли с’ѝнә ли ч’әрв’ѐнә ли ура̀нжева̀ ли

61 (b) [2:05]       нә ено̀ нә ено̀ту

62 (a) [2:06]       ква̀ту ѝскәш’пр’ѐж’дә сла̀гәш’ кәза̀нә буедѝсвәш

63 (a) [2:09]       буедѝсәш’ една̀тә ма̀hнеш’ йә буедѝсәш’ дру̀гә па̀к буедѝсвәмѐ си

64 (b) [2:14]       и с кәмен’о̀к буедѝсвәhә па̀к

65 (MM)       ка̀к

66 (a) [2:16]       и кәту вәлѝ вре̂̀мету па̀к ѝдим нәбирѐме кәмен’о̀к ут ка̀мәнете

67 (MM)       какво̀ е това̀ камен’о̀к

68 (b) [2:20]       ут ка̀мәните съ̀шту кәту сл’а̀с тәко̀ә

69 (a) [2:20]       вәс ка̀мәкә кәмен’о̀к

70 (b) [2:22]       рәстѐ нә ка̀мәнете тәко̀ә

71 (a) [2:24]       ѝмә н’е̂̀ш’ту кәту курѝч’кә тәка̀ вәс ка̀мәкә

72 (b) [2:27]       пѐпел

73 (a) [2:27]       уб’е̂̀лиме уб’е̂̀лиме

74 (MM)       а̀ тва̀ по ка̀мәкә ə

75 (a) [2:30]       и а̀

76 (b) [2:31]       да̀

77 (MM)       и това̀ му вѝкате камен’о̀к

78 (b) [2:32]       кәмен’о̀к да̀

79 (a) [2:32]       а нə н’ѐгу кәмен’о̀к о̀ти ут ка̀мәк

80 (MM)       и какъ̀ф цвѐт е то̀

81 (a) [2:35]       еми тәкъ̀ф кәту сѝф н’е̂̀ш’ту ѐ кәту пәнтәло̀нә

82 (MM)       да̀

83 (a) [2:39]       ма̀лку ф сѝву тәкъ̀ф е цветъ̀

84 (MM)       да̀

85 (a) [2:43]       сѝву

86 (MM)       аhа̀ това̀ не съ̀м чу̀вал

87 (a) [2:45]       нәбир’ѐм кәмен’о̀к нәбир’ѐм

88 (b) [2:45]       и с корѝ буйәдѝсвәт

89 (a) [2:46]       извәрѝме гу н’ѐгу вәф кәза̀нә извәрѝме изва̀диш’ н’ѐгу ма̀hниш’

90 (a) [2:49]       сло̀ж’иш’ пр’ѐж’дәтә сло̀ж’иш’ и кәмен’о̀кә вәрhу̀ о̀ш

91 (b) [2:53]       и сәс курѝ

92 (a) [2:53]       и гу дәрж’иш’

93 (b) [2:54]       и сәс курѝ буедѝсвәhә кәф’а̀ву

94 (a) [2:55]       и йѐлhуви курѝ па̀к

95 (MM)       а̀ ѐлхуви корѝ

96 (a) [3:57]       ут йелhа̀ па̀к ш’ә нәбир’ѐш’ кура̀ па̀к сәс йелhа̀ кура̀ па̀ буедѝсвәме

97 (MM)       да̀

98 (b) [3:02]       ка

99 (a) [3:03]       йѐлhә

100 (b) [3:03]       кәф’а̀ву буедѝсвәт

101 (MM)       hъ̀

102 (a) [3:05]       ѝмә та̀м пуслѐствуту ми е дә ə ѝмә

103 (a) [3:06]       мə не зна̀м кәд’ѐ е вѐч’е

104 (MM)       зна̀чи женѝте си бойадѝсваха ту̀ка

105 (a) [3:13]       буедѝсвәhә си о̀

106 (MM)       не не да̀ваха на дру̀ги места̀ да им се бойадѝсва

107 (b) [3:16]       нѐ нѐ туга̀вә не̂̀мәше

108 (a) [3:16]       нѐ

109 (MM)       на дру̀ги села̀ отна̀с’ат по буйаџѝйници

110 (a) [3:17]       н’е̂̀мәш’е туга̀ф нѝкәдѐ кәдѐ дә буедѝсвәш’ мъ̀ и с’а̀ си буедѝсвәме

111 (b) [3:20]       да

112 (a) [3:20]       и куга̀т си ти до̀йде и куга̀т си ѝмәш’ вр’е̂̀ме

113 (a) [3:23]       па̀к ш’ә си буедѝсвәш’

114 (MM)       да̀ да̀ да̀

115 (a) [3:25]       кәд’ѐ дә ѝдиш’ нә ино̀ вре̂̀ме не̂̀мә кәд’ѐ н’ѐмә кәд’ѐ дә ѝдиш’

116 (a) [3:28]       ко̀й дә ти буедѝсә и уткәд’ѐ а̀ш’келе мина̀вәhә тәка̀ буеџ’ѝи

117 (b) [3:32]       пә дунѝсәт буе̂̀

118 (a) [3:32]       цѝгәнки дру̀ги тр’ѐти тә нәзѝмиш’ буйъ̀ тә си буедѝсвәш’

119 (a) [3:35]       тә си нәпра̀иш’ не̂̀ш’ту дә си ѝма дə се убл’әч’ѐш’

120 (MM)       да̀ да̀ да̀ да̀

121 (a) [3:39]       дума̀ш’ни е̂̀би си пра̀веhме ч’ъ̀рните въ̀лни си па̀

122 (a) [3:42]       пра̀вена әбъ̀ дума̀ш’нә зә мәж’ѐту пәнтәло̀не

123 (b) [3:44]       зә пәнтәло̀н

124 (MM)       така̀

125 (a) [3:46]       а

126 (b) [3:46]       сəс чѐрнә въ̀лнә

127 (a) [3:47]       н’е̂̀мәш’е дә ку̀пə уд мәгәзѝнә удд’ѐ ш’ә нәм’е̂̀р’ә н’ѐмә уткәд’ѐ

128 (a) [3:51]       ч’и ст’ъ̀гәй сә па̀ пр’ѐди нә руда̀нə тъ̀нку пр’ѐди

129 (a) [3:54]       л’е̂̀ти па̀ пупа̀риш’ сәс брәш’но̀ әбъ̀тә дә ни съ̀ къ̀сә̥

130 (b) [3:58]       кəту сә путсечѐ

131 (a) [3:59]       тва̀ нә се̂̀ки р’ъ̀т пу една̀ стѝскә брәш’но̀ уръ̀ж’ену брәш’но̀

132 (a) [4:02]       уд рәштъ̀ зәбъ̀ркәш’ кәту па̀ренѝцә зәбъ̀ркәш’ зәбъ̀ркәш’

133 (a) [4:06]       и гу сѝпиш’ фәф вудъ̀тә и нәтупѝш’ пр’ѐж’дите

134 (MM)       така̀

135 (a) [4:10]       ма̀лку дә фтвәрдѝ и слет тва̀ гу сла̀гәш’ н’ѐгу зә усно̀вә

136 (a) [4:13]       ә дру̀гуту пәк тәч’ѐш’ зә въ̀тәк

137 (a) [4:16]       пу ч’итѝрəси пу педес’ѐ м’ѐтрә сәм истка̀вәлә дума̀шнә hәбъ̀ ч’ъ̀рнә

138 (MM)       hə

139 (a) [4:20]       фрѐд бе̂̀hә сѝч’ките

140 (b) [4:21]       əмhəм

141 (a) [4:21]       мъ̀ш’ките на̀ш’те пәнтәло̀ни

142 (a) [4:22]       еми кво̀ ше пра̀иш

143 (a) [4:23]       туга̀ф тра̀мпите са̀му ту̀к енѝ о̀рә ѝмәш’е едно̀вре̂̀меш’ни ш’ива̀ч’и

144 (b) [4:26]       терзѝйә

145 (a) [4:27]       әhә̀ терзѝйәтә тра̀мпуски та̀м о̀деә дә ги ш’ѝйәт

146 (b) [4:29]       әә̀

147 (a) [4:31]       а̀ мъ̀ч’еhмѐ сә мло̀гу нә вре̂̀мету мло̀гу

148 (MM)       ама сѝчко сте моглѝ да пра̀вите

149 (a) [4:36]       а̀ мо̀џ’ин и с’а̀ ми с’а̀ дә мѝ сә уддәдѐ

150 (a) [4:39]       и с’а̀ ш си пра̀ве

151 (MM)       да̀

152 (a) [4:40]       сѝч’ките у̀реди си сид’ъ̀т сѝч’ку сѝ ти с’әдѝ

153 (a) [4:42]       и мо̀џ’е дә гу пра̀виш’

154 (b) [4:44]       [смях]

155 (a) [4:45]       вре̂̀мету ка̀рә кәкво̀ дә пра̀виш’ дә ти ка̀ж’ә

156 (a) [4:48]       ка̀рә сәмо̀ту вре̂̀ме си тə о̀дə

157 (MM)       то̀чно така̀ е точно така̀

158 (a) [4:50]       о̀дə си тѐ

159 (MM)       добрѐ абъ̀тъ не е на вал’а̀вица нə но̀сих

160 (a) [4:54]       но̀сим а па̀ фәф дуспа̀т

161 (MM)       та̀м ѝмаше

162 (a) [4:56]       ѝмә тупа̀вицә му вѝкәме

163 (b) [4:57]       тупа̀вицә

164 (MM)       а тупа̀вица а̀

165 (a) [4:58]       тупа̀вицә̥ на̀ сега̀ та̀мкәна̀ йә исту̀пвәт и

166 (a) [5:01]       дума̀ш’ни турбѝ си тәч’ѐме ч’е̂̀нти дума̀ш’ни въ̀л’нени па̀к

167 (MM)       ъ̀

168 (a) [5:05]       ѐ тәка̀ кәту пәнтәло̀нә пруша̀рену

169 (b) [5:07]       ша̀рену

170 (MM)       əhə̀ əhə̀ əhə̀

171 (b) [5:08]       б’а̀лу и ч’ѐрну

172 (a) [5:09]       б’е̂̀лу и ч’ъ̀рну ква̀т ти уйдѝсə

173 (MM)       и такѝ такѝва цветовѐ б’а̀ха

174 (b) [5:12]       да̀

175 (a) [5:12]       тәквѝ цв’етувѐ турбѝ

176 (b) [5:13]       дру̀ги нѐ сла̀гәhә

177 (a) [5:15]       и истәч’ѐш’ си әбѝте б’а̀ләтә ч’ъ̀рнәтә турбѝте

178 (a) [5:18]       а̀йде и нә дуспа̀т с ко̀нә шә ги зәка̀рәш’ та̀м

179 (a) [5:22]       дә ги исту̀пәт дә ги исту̀пәт дә ги ис упра̀в’ет

180 (a) [5:24]       и си ги зѝмәш’ па̀к нәза̀т’

181 (b) [5:25]       дә мо̀ж дә рәбо̀тиш

182 (a) [5:26]       дә ги изва̀л’ет

183 (b) [5:27]       исуш’а̀вәт hу̀буу дә мо̀же

184 (MM)       да̀ да̀ да̀ да̀

185 (a) [5:29]       ә ч’и туга̀ф ту̀ф дунесъ̀т па̀ ги исп’ъ̀ниш съз бу̀куву дъ̀рву

186 (MM)       тъ̀й

187 (a) [5:32]       зәко̀пч’иж’ ги нис тера̀сәтә нәдо̀л или нис къ̀штәтә кәд’ѐ до̀йде

188 (b) [5:36]       т’ѐж’ес дә сә испъ̀нәт

189 (a) [5:36]       и испѐниш’ т’ѐж’ес

190 (MM)       тъ̀й

191 (b) [5:38]       әбъ̀тә дә сә испъ̀не

192 (MM)       абъ̀та

193 (a) [5:39]       с т’ѐж’ес дә мо̀џ’е дә hлъ̀тне әбъ̀тә

194 (b) [5:40]       та да се изтъ̀ни

195 (a) [5:41]       дә ста̀не тъ̀нкә дә ста̀не исп’ъ̀нәтә

196 (a) [5:44]       дә дə мо̀џ’е дә ш’ѝе ш’ива̀ч’ә по̀ hу̀бәву

197 (a) [5:46]       то̀ дә му сә ш’ѝе у̀бəве

198 (MM)       вѐ

199 (a) [5:48]       ина̀че ста̀вә ръ̀б’әстә ста̀вә нә гъ̀нки

200 (MM)       да да

201 (a) [5:51]       а тәка̀ плъ̀тну исп’ъ̀нәтә гла̀тич’кә ста̀не тәка̀

202 (RA)       hм

203 (a) [5:54]       ено вре̂̀ме н’ѐмәш’е ӥтѝи с кво̀ дә се гла̀т’ет

204 (a) [5:57]       пәнтәло̀нә дәлѝ е ума̀ч’кәт дәлѝ н’ѐ ш’ә нəга̀диш

205 (a) [6:00]       ш’ә вәрвѝш’ н’ѐмә на̀чин

206 (MM)       ѐй мно̀го шу̀м бе

207 (a) [6:02]       ш’ә вәрвѝш’ деч’ѝцә

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Comments and questions may be addressed to bdlt@berkeley.edu.

Recommended Model for Citations

Bulgarian Dialectology as Living Tradition [2016] (http://www.bulgariandialectology.org, visited on 1 March 2016)
Babjak 1: 13-15. In: Bulgarian Dialectology as Living Tradition [2016] (http://www.bulgariandialectology.org, visited on 1 March 2016)

Text | by Dr. Radut