Iskrica 3

1 (KK)       Tell me about your life, from childhood onwards.

tell sg imv P
dat 1sg clt
about
life sg m def
dat refl clt
from
childhood sg n

2 (c) [0:03]      From childhood – what to tell you? We were many brothers,

disc
from
childhood sg n what sg n interr
comp
dat 2sg clt
tell 1sg pres I nom 1pl 1pl impf cop many adv brother pl m

3 (c) [0:05]      five brothers and two sisters: seven “chunks”. I was the youngest.

five brother pl m
and
two f sister f pl seven piece pl n nom 1sg 1sg pres cop clt most little sg m def adj

4 (c) [0:11]      As it turned out, I’m alone [now]; all of them had already departed this world.

and
how rel become 3sg aor P alone sg m adj already adv all pl def
dat refl clt
go 3pl aor P
from
this sg n adj world sg m

5 (c) [0:17]      I went to school, and really wanted to learn. But back then it was like this:

go 1sg impf I
to
school sg n def learn 3sg impf I
dat 1sg clt
acc refl clt
much adv then adv 3sg impf cop thus adv

6 (c) [0:22]      one brother does the plowing, another did other jobs, and yet another

one sg m adj brother sg m plow 3sg pres I other sg m adj and other pl adj work pl f do 3sg pres I
and
other sg m adj and

7 (c) [0:28]      pastured the sheep. And when I got back from school it was my turn

pasture 3sg pres I sheep pl f def
and
nom 1sg when conj
dat refl clt
return 1sg pres P
from
school sg n def like turn sg m

8 (c) [0:35]      to go [help] gather up the ewes, the mothers of suckling lambs. That’s how it was then.

go 1pl pres I
comp
gather 1pl pres I ewe pl f def mother pl f def
to
lamb pl n def
comp
suckle 3pl pres I then adv thus adv 3sg impf cop

9 (c) [0:42]      They didn’t wait till evening for [the ewes] to come, rather it was in the afternoon,

neg
acc 3pl clt
wait 3pl impf I acc 3pl evening sg f def
comp
dat refl clt
come 3pl pres P but
ost
by
noon sg m

10 (c) [0:46]      around two or three o’clock that they must come, so the lambs wouldn’t get too hungry.

two m three hour sg m def must pres I imprs
dat refl clt
come 3pl pres P lamb pl n def
comp
neg
get.hungry 3pl pres I much adv

11 (c) [0:50]      We collect them, and drive them to the village – just the mothers that are suckling lambs.

collect 1pl pres P
acc 3pl clt
with
bring 1pl pres P
acc 3pl clt
to
village sg n only adv mother pl f def when conj suckle 3pl pres I lamb pl n def

12 (c) [0:55]      Then we take them back to the meadow near our village –

and
after adv
acc 3pl clt
remove 1pl pres I and there adv
by
meadow sg f def
by
by
village sg n def
dat 1pl clt
[...]

13 (c) [0:59]      we live at the edge of the village – and the lambs graze together with their mothers.

end sg m def live 1pl pres I
to
village sg n def take.out 1pl pres P
and
there adv graze 3pl pres I lamb pl n def
and
mother pl f def
dat 3pl clt

14 (c) [1:05]      They graze until it gets dark, and when the others come we [all] go home.

graze 3pl pres I until conj
acc refl clt
get.dark 3sg pres P
and
when conj come 3pl pres P other pl def adj
and
acc refl clt
gather 1pl pres

15 (c) [1:09]      That was one thing I did, working as a shepherd. So later when I finished –

this sg n adj 3sg impf cop one sg f def adj work sg f shepherd.trade sg m def later adv when conj
and
finish 1sg aor P

16 (c) [1:13]      I finished seventh grade, and there was nowhere to go, nothing to do,

nom 1sg finish 1sg aor P seventh sg m adj grade sg m pres neg exist where interr
comp
go 1sg pres P what sg n interr
comp
do 1sg pres I

17 (c) [1:18]      nobody to support me to study anything further.

which sg m interr fut
acc 1sg clt
support 3sg pres P
comp
go 1sg pres P
comp
study 1sg pres I something sg n
and

18 (c) [1:21]      And I was really keen on sheep. I liked animals a lot, in fact.

and
1sg impf cop eager.one sg m very adv
for
sheep pl f def but much adv
acc 3pl clt
love 1sg impf I animal pl n def adrs

19 (c) [1:29]      I liked not only sheep but all animals, a lot. And I began

not only adv sheep pl f def all pl adj animal pl n
acc 3pl clt
love 1sg impf I much adv
and
begin 1sg aor P

20 (c) [1:29]      to pasture sheep. I pastured ours, and the neighbor’s, and those of some others.

comp
pasture 1sg pres I sheep pl f pasture 1sg impf I our pl def adj
and
to
neighbor pl m def there adv some pl adj other pl adj

21 (c) [1:37]      Not just ours then. So we pastured them.

comp
comp
neg
3pl pres cop clt only adv
with
our pl def adj adrs
and
[...]
pasture 1pl impf I
acc 3pl clt

22 (c) [1:44]      What can I tell you – later they made for me, up in the fields, this –

what sg n interr
comp
dat 2sg clt
tell 1sg pres I after adv
on
field sg m def
dat 1sg clt
make 3pl aor P there adv
ost
such sg n adj

23 (c) [1:53]      “saya” (sheepfold), as we call it. A “kushara” (sheepfold), yes – a “kushara”.

sheepfold sg f rel
dat n 3sg clt
call 1pl pres I nom 1pl
or
sheepfold sg f
disc
thus adv sheepfold sg f

24 (c) [1:56]      And in the spring, when the weather turns to spring, you’re up at the sheepfold,

and
there adv spring sg n adj time sg n when conj
acc refl clt
turn.spring 3sg pres P this sg n adj time sg n
2sg pres cop clt
there adv
by
sheepfold sg f def

25 (c) [2:02]      and pasture the sheep there. They bring me up bread to eat.

there adv
acc 3pl clt
pasture 1pl pres I sheep pl f def there adv
dat 1sg clt
carry 3pl pres I bread sg m
comp
eat 1sg pres I

26 (c) [2:06]      [I’m] not in the village at all, only when I go to change clothes or such,

in
village sg n pres neg exist
in
village sg n when inter.rel
acc refl clt
change.clothes 1sg pres I some.kind sg n adj

27 (c) [2:08]      or when there’s some occasion such as Easter or St. George’s Day.

or and
if conj
pres exist some.kind sg n adj such sg n adj
comp
say 1pl pres P Easter sg m St.George's.day sg m

28 (c) [2:12]      Then one of my older brothers would come – they were all married,

when conj come 3sg pres P some sg m adj brother sg m more big pl def adj 3pl impf cop all adv marry pl P.part I

29 (c) [2:14]      I was the youngest and was unmarried – to take my place

nom 1sg 1sg pres cop clt most little sg m def adj
neg
1sg impf cop marry sg m P.part I adrs
and
comp
acc 1sg clt
replace 3pl pres P

30 (c) [2:19]      so I could go down to the village to feast my eyes on the girls! [laughter]

and
comp
comp
go 1sg pres P
and
nom 1sg
comp
go.out 1sg pres P there adv
comp
look 1sg pres I girl pl f def

31 (KK)       [How do you look after sheep?]

32 (c) [2:24]      In the old days we kept them separate from the rams. The rams were kept apart

sheep pl f def one sg n adj time sg n
acc 3pl clt
keep 1pl impf I without ram pl m def
acc 3pl clt
separate 1pl impf I separate pl P.part P ram pl m def

33 (c) [2:29]      until St. Petko’s Day. St. Petko’s Day is on October 27th.

to St. Petko's day sg m St. Petko's day sg m happen 3sg pres I
on
twenty
and
seventh sg m adj October m

35 (c) [2:34]      Then we allow the sheep to breed so they will get pregnant,

then adv
acc 3pl clt
release 1pl pres I sheep pl f def
comp
acc refl clt
breed 3pl pres I sheep pl f def already adv
comp
acc refl clt
conceive 3pl pres P

35 (c) [3:38]      so they will lamb on the twenty-second of February – that is, of March.

because conj
comp
acc refl clt
lamb 3pl pres P twenty
and
second sg m adj February sg m this sg n adj March sg m

36 (c) [2:42]      When it’s warm. Earlier than that is cold, and the lambs can’t grow –

when inter.rel
acc refl clt
get.warm 3sg pres P more early adv cold adv lamb pl n def
neg
can 3pl pres I
comp
grow 3pl pres I

37 (c) [2:48]      you need good conditions. So I breed them. After the sheep are impregnated,

want 3sg pres I condition pl n
and
then adv
acc 3pl clt
release 1sg pres P
and
when conj
acc refl clt
conceive 3pl pres P sheep pl f def already adv

38 (c) [2:57]      [they carry it] throughout the winter, and then begin to lamb on March 22nd.

during winter sg f def nom 3pl begin 3pl pres I
comp
acc refl clt
lamb 3pl pres I then adv
on
twenty
and
second sg m adj March sg m

39 (c) [3:01]      They begin to lamb, and we’re up at the sheepfold. We take them there

begin 3pl pres I
comp
acc refl clt
lamb 3pl pres I again adv
1pl pres cop clt
on
sheepfold sg f def
acc 3pl clt
remove 1pl pres I there adv

40 (c) [3:06]      and pasture the sheep and lambs. They bring us bread there and take [stuff] back.

and
pasture 1pl pres I
acc 3pl clt
there adv lamb pl n def sheep pl f def carry 3pl pres I
dat 1pl clt
bread sg m there adv gather 3pl pres I

41 (c) [3:14]      On Christmas and St. George’s Day we slaughter lambs, that was the rule then

Christmas sg f
on
St.George's.day sg m must pres I imprs
comp
slaughter 1pl pres P lamb sg n this sg n adj 3sg impf cop law sg m then adv

42 (c) [3:18]      for villagers. The best lamb would be for St. George’s day. They’d come up:

for
villager pl m def adrs most nice sg n def adj lamb sg n with
on
St.George's.day sg m
fut
come 3pl pres P

43 (c) [3:23]      my older brothers would get [the lamb]. They then take it [down],

fut
acc n 3sg clt
take 3pl pres P there adv brother pl m def
dat 1sg clt
more big pl def adj
and
drive 3pl pres I

44 (c) [3:28]      they slaughter it and prepare it. People roasted lambs whole in the outdoor oven –

slaughter 3pl pres P
acc n 3sg clt
make 3pl pres I
acc n 3sg clt
whole sg n adj
acc n 3sg clt
roast 3pl impf I in
outdoor.oven pl f

45 (c) [3:31]      there were these village ovens that several neighbors would share –

impf exist village pl adj outdoor.oven pl f such pl adj there adv
by
for
several adv neighbor pl m
acc refl clt
gather 3pl pres P

46 (c) [3:37]      and they stuff the lamb after they skinned it, only removing the entrails.

and
acc n 3sg clt
fill 3pl pres P lamb sg n def when conj
acc n 3sg clt
skin 3pl pres P only adv
dat n 3sg clt
extract 3pl pres P entrails pl f def from.inside adv

47 (c) [3:42]      They fill the other [parts] with rice and different things,

other sg n def
acc n 3sg clt
fill 3pl impf I there adv with
rice sg m with
most different pl adj thing pl f there adv

48 (c) [3:46]      with leeks, or whatever they had, to put in there.

with
leeks pl n
interr clt
with
what sg n rel want 3sg pres I
comp
3sg pres cop clt
and
acc n 3sg clt
put 3pl pres I

49 (c) [3:49]      Then they sew it up again, and put it in the oven to roast.

sew 3pl pres P
acc n 3sg clt
again adv
and
acc n 3sg clt
put 3pl impf I in
large.oven sg f def
comp
acc refl clt
roast 3sg pres P

50 (c) [3:53]      On St. George’s Day we’d gather, the entire village, on the village square.

and
on
St.George's.day sg m entire sg n def adj village sg n
acc refl clt
gather 1pl impf I
on
square sg m

51 (c) [4:03]      There’s a big square where the entire village gathers. They bring in the lambs –

pres exist one sg m adj big sg m adj square sg m entire sg n def adj village sg n there adv
acc refl clt
gather 3pl pres I carry 3pl pres I lamb pl n def

52 (c) [4:03]      they bring the entire lamb roasts there, and the priest comes by to bless them.

entire pl def adj lamb pl n
acc 3pl clt
carry 3pl pres I there adv
and
priest sg m def pass 3sg pres P
and
acc 3pl clt
bless 3sg pres I

53 (c) [4:08]      He blesses them one after another, sprinkles them [with holy water] and blesses them,

in.order adv all pl adj
acc 3pl clt
bless 3sg pres I sprinkle 3sg pres I
acc 3pl clt
there adv
and
acc 3pl clt
bless 3sg pres I

54 (c) [4:12]      and everyone gives a piece [of his lamb] to the priest.

and
all pl def
dat m 3sg clt
give 3pl pres I
by
one sg n adj piece sg n
to
priest sg m def

55 (d) [4:14]      This didn’t get recorded.

[...]
nom sg n
neg
3sg impf cop write sg n P.part P

56 (c) [4:16]      So when the priest comes and blesses the lambs and each one gives a piece

disc
when conj pass 3sg pres P priest sg m def bless 3sg pres P
[...]
lamb pl n def give 3pl pres P
dat m 3sg clt
by
one sg n adj piece sg n all pl adj

57 (c) [4:22]      to the priest, then all the others start to eat, and the revelry begins.

to
priest sg m def
and
other pl def adj begin 3pl pres P eat 3pl pres P there adv all pl def
and
begin 3pl pres I already adv revelry pl f def

58 (c) [4:29]      Musicians play, people dance the round dance. There wasn’t today’s dancing,

music sg f pres exist play 3pl pres I dance 3pl pres I round.dance pl n then adv dance vbl.n I impf neg exist what sg n rel now adv

59 (c) [4:35]      these fancy dance things they do [now]. Only round dance, rŭchenitsa, line dances.

this pl adj thing pl f dance pl n "mance" pl f disc pres neg exist only adv round.dance pl n rŭchenitsa pl f straight pl adj round.dance pl n

60 (c) [4:39]      That’s how they danced in the old days. Till evening – this revelry

ost
this sg n adj
acc refl clt
play 3sg impf I
on
time sg n def
to
evening sg f def this f adj revelry sg f

61 (c) [4:43]      went on till evening, and then everyone went home, each to his house.

3sg impf cop
to
evening sg f def
and
evening sg f def
acc refl clt
gather 3pl pres I people pl def each sg m adj at.home adv
dat refl clt

62 (KK)       [So what kind of a holiday was St. George’s Day?]

63 (c) [4:48]      Well, when they celebrate St. George’s Day, it’s shepherds –

disc
make 3pl pres I St.George's.day sg m 3sg impf cop holiday sg m
to
[...]
to
shepherd sg m def

64 (c) [4:52]      it’s really the holiday of shepherds, but now they’ve dressed it up as

or
to
shepherd sg m def adrs rel
acc m 3sg clt
nom m 3sg now adv even adv
acc m 3sg clt
drive.out 3pl pres I

65 (c) [4:56]      this “holiday of St. George”. People gather together,

and
there adv
to
saint sg m adj Georgi sg m name holiday sg m but
and
gather 3pl pres I
acc refl clt
there adv people pl def

66 (c) [5:02]      they eat and drink and dance the round dance and rŭchenitsa until evening,

eat 3pl pres I
and
drink 3pl pres I dance 3pl pres I round.dance pl n rŭchenitsa pl f
to
evening sg f def
and
evening sg f def already adv

67 (c) [5:08]      and when it gets dark everyone goes home because they didn’t have this night life then,

when conj
acc refl clt
get.dark 3sg pres P everything sg n adj
acc refl clt
gather 3sg pres I because then adv impf neg exist such pl adj night pl adj thing pl f

68 (c) [5:11]      [like now] when young people go out all night. There weren’t such things then.

comp
walk 3pl pres I
ost
by
entire sg f adj evening sg f young pl adj pres neg exist such sg f adj thing sg f

69 (c) [5:14]      Everybody went home.

everything sg n
acc refl clt
gather 3sg pres I at.home adv

70 (KK)       [What do you do when lambs begin to be born?]

71 (c) [5:16]      When the ewes start to lamb, I know for each one of them more or less

nom sg n when conj begin 3sg pres P
comp
acc refl clt
lamb 3sg pres I every sg f adj sheep sg f down adv above adv
dat f 3sg clt
know 1sg pres I

72 (c) [5:20]      the date when it was bred, and thus the day it should lamb.

hes
date sg f def when rel
3sg pres cop clt
breed sg f P.part P
and
[…]
which sg m interr day sg m must pres I imprs
acc refl clt
lamb 3sg pres P

73 (c) [5:24]      We watch [that one] and when the time comes we help it.

and
acc f 3sg
observe 1pl pres I
and
when conj come 3sg pres P time sg n there adv
[...]
help 1pl pres P
dat f 3sg clt

74 (c) [5:28]      When one lambs, we give it the lamb to suckle,

lamb 3sg pres P
acc refl clt
put 1pl pres P give 1pl pres P
to
lamb sg n def
comp
dat refl clt
suckle 3sg pres I

75 (c) [5:33]      to suckle really good first off. In some cases, though,

most before adv
comp
suckle 3sg pres P pretty adv
to
some pl adj
ost

76 (c) [5:35]      the lambs are just born feeble, and they don’t want to suckle on they own,

such pl adj
acc refl clt
lamb 3pl pres I more get.feeble pl P.part P
neg
dat refl clt
neg
want 3pl pres I
comp
suckle 3pl pres I

77 (c) [5:40]      and we push these ones to suckle. But if it just won’t suckle for you,

but nom 1pl
acc 3pl clt
force 1pl pres P there adv [...]
if conj
not suckle 3sg pres I
interr clt
dat 2sg clt
acc refl clt

78 (c) [5:44]      we give it milk with a spoon. Just enough for it to get strong,

give 1pl pres P
with
spoon sg f milk sg n only adv
and
only adv
comp
acc n 3sg clt
strengthen 1pl pres P

79 (c) [5:46]      to be able to manage. And when it comes into its own it begins

and
comp
can 3sg pres I already adv when conj
acc refl clt
recover 3sg pres P
and
comp
begin 3sg pres P

80 (c) [5:50]      to suckle on its own, then it goes along with its mother and suckles.

comp
dat refl clt
suckle 3sg pres I alone sg n adj
and
dat refl clt
walk 3sg pres I after mother sg f def
and
suckle 3sg pres I
dat refl clt

81 (KK)       [What do you do when the lambs start to grow?]

82 (c) [5:55]      When the lambs start to grow, we take the sheep up on their own

disc
when conj grow.up 3pl pres lamb pl n def already adv
for
sheep pl f def
acc 3pl clt
remove 1pl pres I already adv

83 (c) [6:02]      to pasture them at night. We separate the lambs from them, and wean them

in
night sg n adj time sg n
comp
acc 3pl clt
pasture 1pl pres I lamb pl n def
acc 3pl clt
separate 1pl pres P
and
acc 3pl clt
wean 1pl pres I

84 (c) [6:06]      so that they stop suckling, and we can begin to milk their mothers.

[...]
comp
neg
suckle 3pl pres I already adv begin 1pl pres I
comp
milk 1pl pres I mother pl f def
dat 3pl clt

85 (c) [6:15]      After all, we [need] milk to make cheese to eat, yogurt and fresh milk [to drink].

milk sg n def interr make 1pl pres P cheese sg n
comp
eat 1pl pres I milk sg n sour sg n adj fresh sg n adj

86 (c) [6:15]      And back then, we’d take the sheep to pasture them during the night.

and
sheep pl f def go 1pl impf I night sg n adj time sg n
comp
acc 3pl clt
pasture 1pl pres I then adv

87 (c) [6:19]      The sun goes down, and off we go with them.

sun sg n def set 3sg pres I nom 1pl
acc 3pl clt
remove 1pl pres I

88 (KK)       All night.

entire sg f adj evening sg f

89 (c) [6:27]      All night, up to morning. In the morning when the sun gets strong they must return

entire sg f adj evening sg f
to
morning adv morning adv heat 3sg pres P
interr clt
sun sg n def nom 3pl must pres I imprs
acc refl clt
gather 3pl pres I

90 (c) [6:27]      to the sheepfold. We milk them again, and then we lie down to sleep.

in
sheepfold sg f def again adv
acc 3pl clt
milk 1pl pres P
and
nom 1pl lie 1pl pres I
comp
sleep 1pl pres I

91 (c) [6:30]      They lie there all day, and then the next evening the same thing

and
nom 3pl lie 3pl pres I entire sg m adj day sg m
and
other sg f def adj evening sg f again adv same sg f def adj thing sg f

92 (c) [6:33]      happens again. That’s how we pastured them then. Not like now,

acc refl clt
repeat 3sg pres I adrs thus adv
dat refl clt
acc 3pl clt
pasture 1pl impf I sheep pl f def then adv impf neg exist when conj now adv

93 (c) [6:37]      priz denɤ̀ də gi pəsɤ̀t tugàə vèčer sàmu vèčer

during day sg m def
comp
acc 3pl clt
graze 3pl pres I then adv evening sg f only adv evening sg f

94 (c) [6:40]      If the sun is strong, you don’t pasture the sheep.

bake 3sg pres I
interr clt
sun sg n sheep sg f
neg
pasture 2sg pres I

95 (KK)       What kinds of illnesses did sheep have, and how did you treat them?

what.kind pl adj illness pl f def
and
[...]
[...]
3sg pres aux clt
sg n L.part exist
on
sheep f def pl
and
how interr
2pl pres aux clt
acc 3pl clt
heal pl L.part I

96 (c) [6:47]      Well, there was this illness called distoma (liver-fluke), and we force-feed them –

disc
this sg n adj 3sg impf cop illness sg f def
for
this sg n adj
for
distoma sg m def then adv
and
feed 1pl pres I

97 (c) [6:52]      we call it force-feeding [them when] we give them – everyone [did this],

say 1pl pres I
acc n 3sg clt
feed 1pl pres P
acc 3pl clt
give 1pl pres I
dat 3pl clt
and
entire sg f adj all pl def people pl

98 (c) [6:55]      it was the law – we get pills from the veterinarian and give them the pills.

this sg n adj 3sg impf cop law sg m take 1pl pres I
dat 3pl clt
pill pl m
from
veterinary pl def adj doctor pl m
and
acc 3pl clt
give 1pl pres I

99 (c) [7:02]      When we give them these pills, we don’t let them out at night to graze.

when conj
dat 3pl clt
give 1pl pres P
to
evening sg f def
neg
acc 3pl clt
release 1pl pres I
comp
graze 3pl pres I

100 (c) [7:06]      For instance if we give them the pills this morning, this evening we don’t let them out.

for.example adv today adv morning sg f def give 1pl pres P pill pl m def
to
evening sg f def
neg
acc 3pl clt
release 1pl pres I
comp
graze 3pl pres I

101 (KK)       How did shepherds dress? What was shepherds’ clothing like?

and
with
what sg n interr
2pl pres aux clt
acc refl clt
dress pl L.part I shepherd sg n adj dress sg n what.kind sg n adj
3sg pres cop clt

102 (c) [7:14]      Shepherd’s clothing.

shepherd sg n adj dress sg n

103 (d) [7:16]      Baggy trousers.

baggy.trousers pl.t

104 (c) [7:16]      Sandals. Sandals of pigskin, white leg-wrappings, black cords wound about up to here –

sandal pl m pig pl adj sandal pl m white pl adj leg.wrappings pl.t black pl adj cord pl f wind pl P.part thus adv
ost
here adv

105 (c) [7:24]      we tie them crossed over several times. So black and white cords, leg-wrappings,

and
on
cross sg m
acc 3pl clt
make 1pl pres I several adv time pl m disc white pl adj black pl adj cord pl f leg.wrappings pl.t there adv

106 (c) [7:36]      sandals, baggy trousers – we go about with a belt, a large belt around the waist.

sandal pl m this sg n adj with
baggy.trousers pl.t go 1pl impf I belt sg m wind sg m P
ost
big sg m adj belt sg m around waist sg m def

107 (c) [7:36]      We’re dressed sensibly, because out in the fields you can get caught in the rain,

dress pl P.part P adv because conj
on
field sg m def can 3sg pres I
acc 2sg clt
grab 3sg pres P
and
rain sg m

108 (c) [7:40]      you can get caught in the cold, or anything. We have these big – we called them cloaks.

can 3sg pres I
acc 2sg clt
grab 3sg pres P
and
cold sg n adj everything sg n
and
have 1pl pres I big pl adj felt.cloak pl m
dat n 3sg clt
call 1pl impf I

109 (c) [7:46]      Like hoods, but we call it “yamurluk” (cloak). That’s a Turkish word –

such sg n adj hood sg f but nom 1pl
dat n 3sg clt
call 1pl pres I hooded.cloak sg m
from
this sg n adj Turkish sg f adj word sg f

110 (c) [7:51]      it seems that “yamurluk” is [Turkish]. And it covers you up completely,

this sg n adj hooded.cloak sg m seem 3sg pres I
ost
nom f 3sg
acc 2sg clt
wrap 3sg pres I with
acc f 3sg whole sg n adj

111 (c) [7:55]      with the hood on your head, and bound up in front. It keeps you really warm.

with
hood sg f def
on
head sg f def front adv when conj
acc refl clt
wrap 2sg pres P
and
warm 3sg pres I much adv

112 (c) [8.00]      They were made of felt. Back then they fulled the cloth and it got very thick,

nom 3pl 3pl impf cop full pl P.part P then adv
acc 3pl clt
full 3pl impf I
and
become 3sg pres I thick pl m adj cloth sg m def

113 (c) [8:05]      it kept out the rain and kept out the wind.

and
neg
allow 3sg pres I
and
rain sg m
neg
allow 3sg pres I
and
wind sg m

114 (KK)       [What kind of sheep did you raise?]

115 (c) [8:08]      There was [just] the local type of sheep then, our Balkan sheep.

local sg f adj breed sg f sheep pl f then adv
dat refl clt
3pl impf cop Balkan pl adj sheep pl f our pl adj dat refl clt

116 (c) [8:13]      They were all with long, sharp wool. That’s their wool.

3pl impf cop all.the.time adv such pl adj long sg f adj wool sg f sharp sg f adj wool sg f
and
nom f 3sg

         Tell me about your life, from childhood onwards.

         From childhood – what to tell you? We were many brothers,

         five brothers and two sisters: seven “chunks”. I was the youngest.

         As it turned out, I’m alone [now]; all of them had already departed this world.

         I went to school, and really wanted to learn. But back then it was like this:

         one brother does the plowing, another did other jobs, and yet another

         pastured the sheep. And when I got back from school it was my turn

         to go [help] gather up the ewes, the mothers of suckling lambs. That’s how it was then.

         They didn’t wait till evening for [the ewes] to come, rather it was in the afternoon,

         around two or three o’clock that they must come, so the lambs wouldn’t get too hungry.

         We collect them, and drive them to the village – just the mothers that are suckling lambs.

         Then we take them back to the meadow near our village –

         we live at the edge of the village – and the lambs graze together with their mothers.

         They graze until it gets dark, and when the others come we [all] go home.

         That was one thing I did, working as a shepherd. So later when I finished –

         I finished seventh grade, and there was nowhere to go, nothing to do,

         nobody to support me to study anything further.

         And I was really keen on sheep. I liked animals a lot, in fact.

         I liked not only sheep but all animals, a lot. And I began

         to pasture sheep. I pastured ours, and the neighbor’s, and those of some others.

         Not just ours then. So we pastured them.

         What can I tell you – later they made for me, up in the fields, this –

         “saya” (sheepfold), as we call it. A “kushara” (sheepfold), yes – a “kushara”.

         And in the spring, when the weather turns to spring, you’re up at the sheepfold,

         and pasture the sheep there. They bring me up bread to eat.

         [I’m] not in the village at all, only when I go to change clothes or such,

         or when there’s some occasion such as Easter or St. George’s Day.

         Then one of my older brothers would come – they were all married,

         I was the youngest and was unmarried – to take my place

         so I could go down to the village to feast my eyes on the girls! [laughter]

         [How do you look after sheep?]

         In the old days we kept them separate from the rams. The rams were kept apart

         until St. Petko’s Day. St. Petko’s Day is on October 27th.

         Then we allow the sheep to breed so they will get pregnant,

         so they will lamb on the twenty-second of February – that is, of March.

         When it’s warm. Earlier than that is cold, and the lambs can’t grow –

         you need good conditions. So I breed them. After the sheep are impregnated,

         [they carry it] throughout the winter, and then begin to lamb on March 22nd.

         They begin to lamb, and we’re up at the sheepfold. We take them there

         and pasture the sheep and lambs. They bring us bread there and take [stuff] back.

         On Christmas and St. George’s Day we slaughter lambs, that was the rule then

         for villagers. The best lamb would be for St. George’s day. They’d come up:

         my older brothers would get [the lamb]. They then take it [down],

         they slaughter it and prepare it. People roasted lambs whole in the outdoor oven –

         there were these village ovens that several neighbors would share –

         and they stuff the lamb after they skinned it, only removing the entrails.

         They fill the other [parts] with rice and different things,

         with leeks, or whatever they had, to put in there.

         Then they sew it up again, and put it in the oven to roast.

         On St. George’s Day we’d gather, the entire village, on the village square.

         There’s a big square where the entire village gathers. They bring in the lambs –

         they bring the entire lamb roasts there, and the priest comes by to bless them.

         He blesses them one after another, sprinkles them [with holy water] and blesses them,

         and everyone gives a piece [of his lamb] to the priest.

         This didn’t get recorded.

         So when the priest comes and blesses the lambs and each one gives a piece

         to the priest, then all the others start to eat, and the revelry begins.

         Musicians play, people dance the round dance. There wasn’t today’s dancing,

         these fancy dance things they do [now]. Only round dance, rŭchenitsa, line dances.

         That’s how they danced in the old days. Till evening – this revelry

         went on till evening, and then everyone went home, each to his house.

         [So what kind of a holiday was St. George’s Day?]

         Well, when they celebrate St. George’s Day, it’s shepherds –

         it’s really the holiday of shepherds, but now they’ve dressed it up as

         this “holiday of St. George”. People gather together,

         they eat and drink and dance the round dance and rŭchenitsa until evening,

         and when it gets dark everyone goes home because they didn’t have this night life then,

         [like now] when young people go out all night. There weren’t such things then.

         Everybody went home.

         When the ewes start to lamb, I know for each one of them more or less

         the date when it was bred, and thus the day it should lamb.

         We watch [that one] and when the time comes we help it.

         When one lambs, we give it the lamb to suckle,

         to suckle really good first off. In some cases, though,

         the lambs are just born feeble, and they don’t want to suckle on they own,

         and we push these ones to suckle. But if it just won’t suckle for you,

         we give it milk with a spoon. Just enough for it to get strong,

         to be able to manage. And when it comes into its own it begins

         to suckle on its own, then it goes along with its mother and suckles.

         When the lambs start to grow, we take the sheep up on their own

         to pasture them at night. We separate the lambs from them, and wean them

         so that they stop suckling, and we can begin to milk their mothers.

         After all, we [need] milk to make cheese to eat, yogurt and fresh milk [to drink].

         And back then, we’d take the sheep to pasture them during the night.

         The sun goes down, and off we go with them.

         All night.

         All night, up to morning. In the morning when the sun gets strong they must return

         to the sheepfold. We milk them again, and then we lie down to sleep.

         They lie there all day, and then the next evening the same thing

         happens again. That’s how we pastured them then. Not like now,

         priz denɤ̀ də gi pəsɤ̀t tugàə vèčer sàmu vèčer

         If the sun is strong, you don’t pasture the sheep.

         What kinds of illnesses did sheep have, and how did you treat them?

         Well, there was this illness called distoma (liver-fluke), and we force-feed them –

         we call it force-feeding [them when] we give them – everyone [did this],

         it was the law – we get pills from the veterinarian and give them the pills.

         When we give them these pills, we don’t let them out at night to graze.

         For instance if we give them the pills this morning, this evening we don’t let them out.

         How did shepherds dress? What was shepherds’ clothing like?

         Shepherd’s clothing.

         Baggy trousers.

         Sandals. Sandals of pigskin, white leg-wrappings, black cords wound about up to here –

         we tie them crossed over several times. So black and white cords, leg-wrappings,

         sandals, baggy trousers – we go about with a belt, a large belt around the waist.

         We’re dressed sensibly, because out in the fields you can get caught in the rain,

         you can get caught in the cold, or anything. We have these big – we called them cloaks.

         Like hoods, but we call it “yamurluk” (cloak). That’s a Turkish word –

         it seems that “yamurluk” is [Turkish]. And it covers you up completely,

         with the hood on your head, and bound up in front. It keeps you really warm.

         They were made of felt. Back then they fulled the cloth and it got very thick,

         it kept out the rain and kept out the wind.

         [What kind of sheep did you raise?]

         There was [just] the local type of sheep then, our Balkan sheep.

         They were all with long, sharp wool. That’s their wool.

1 (KK)       раскажѝ ми за живо̀тə си от детѝнство

2 (c) [0:03]       əми ут детѝнству кўо̀ д ти рəспра̀вəм нѝе б’а̀:ме мно̀гу бра̀дуве

3 (c) [0:05]       п’ѐт бра̀т’ə и дв’ѐ сестрѝ с’ѐдем пəрчѐтə а̀с сəм на̀й ма̀лкийа

4 (c) [0:11]       и ка̀кту стəна̀ сəмѝчəк вѐчи сѝчкити си утѝдаа ут то̀у св’а̀т

5 (c) [0:17]       хо̀деh нə училѝшто у̀чеше ми сə мно̀го туга̀вə бѐше тəка̀

6 (c) [0:22]       идѝн бра̀т урѐ дру̀к пəк дру̀ги ра̀бути въ̀рши ə дру̀к пəк

7 (c) [0:28]       пəсѐ уфцѐти и а̀с кəту си въ̀рнə уд учѝлишту кəту ръ̀т

8 (c) [0:35]       о̀дим дə зəбѝрəме̇ мəрѝти ма̀йкити нə а̀гнеа̀та дə су̀чəт туга̀ə тəка̀ бѐши̭

9 (c) [0:42]       ни гѝ ча̀кəə т’а̀h вечертъ̀ дə си до̀əт əми ѐ по обəт

10 (c) [0:46]       два̀ трѝ чəсъ̀ тр’а̀вə си до̀əт а̀гнеа̀тə дə не углəдн’а̀вəт мно̀гу

11 (c) [0:50]       прибирѐм ги сəс дука̀рəме ги ду сѐлу са̀му ма̀йкити кəту су̀чəт а̀гнеатə

12 (c) [0:55]       и после ги иска̀рвəме пəк та̀м ду пул’а̀нəтə ду ду с’ѐлуту ни с

13 (c) [0:59]       кра̀йə живѐем нə с’ѐлото иска̀рəме и та̀м пəсъ̀т йа̀гəнца̀тə и ма̀йкити м

14 (c) [1:05]       пəсъ̀т дукəт сə стъ̀мни и кəту до̀əт дру̀гити и сə прибѝрəми

15 (c) [1:09]       тува̀ бѐши инъ̀та ра̀бутə чубəнлъ̀кə по̀сле кəту и зəвъ̀рши

16 (c) [1:13]       а̀з зəвъ̀ршиh сѐдми кла̀с н’а̀мə кəдѐ дə ѝдə кво̀ дə пра̀а

17 (c) [1:18]       ко̀й жə мə исдъ̀ржə дə ѝдə дə у̀чə н’а̀шту и

18 (c) [1:21]       и б’а̀h мерəклѝйə мно̀гу зə уфцѐти əмə мно̀гу ги убѝчəh жуво̀тните дѐ

19 (c) [1:29]       нѐ са̀му уфцѐти сѝчки живо̀тни ги убѝчəh мно̀гу и по̀чна:

20 (c) [1:29]       дə пəсъ̀ о̀фци пəсе̂̀h на̀шти и нə кумшѝити та̀м н’а̀куи дру̀ги

21 (c) [1:37]       дə дə не съ̀ са̀му с на̀шти дѐ и с пəс’а̀hме ги

22 (c) [1:44]       кво̀ дə ти рəспра̀вəм по̀сле нə къ̀ръ ми нəпра̀иа та̀м ѐ тəко̀ву

23 (c) [1:53]       сəйа̀ дѐту му вѝкəми нѝе ели куша̀рə а тəка̀ куша̀рə

24 (c) [1:56]       и та̀м про̀летну врѐме кəт се зəпрулетѝ тува̀ врѐми си та̀м ду куша̀рəтə

25 (c) [2:02]       та̀м ги пəс’ѐм уфцѐте̇ та̀м ми но̀сəт л’аб дə йа̀м

26 (c) [2:06]       у сѐлу н’а̀мə у сѐлу са̀му га̀ се преублѝчəм н’а̀кву

27 (c) [2:08]       илѝ пəк ку ѝмə н’а̀кву тəко̀ву дə рчѐм вилѝгден герг’о̀вден

28 (c) [2:12]       кəту до̀йде н’а̀куй бра̀т по̀ гулѐмити б’а̀ сѐ жѐнени

29 (c) [2:14]       а̀с сəм на̀й ма̀лкийə не б’а̀h жѐнин дѐ и дə мə смен’ъ̀т

30 (c) [2:19]       и дə дə ѝдə и а̀с дə изл’ѐйə та̀м дə глѐдəм мумѝти [смях]

31 (KK)       [Как се гледат овце?]

32 (c) [2:24]       уфцѐти идно̀ врѐми ги па̀зе:ме бѐс ко̀чувити ги удлъ̀ча:ме утлъ̀кəни ко̀чувити

33 (c) [2:29]       ду̀ питко̀вден питко̀вден ста̀ə нə два̀есе и сѐдми укто̀мври

35 (c) [2:34]       туга̀ə ги пу̀скəме уфцѐте дə сə мъ̀рл’əт уфцѐти вѐчи̭ дə сə зəпло̀дът

35 (c) [3:38]       што̀ту дə сə уа̀гн’əт два̀есе и фто̀ри февруа̀ри тува̀ ма̀рт

36 (c) [2:42]       га̀ сə сто̀пли по̀ ра̀ну студ’ѐну а̀гнеа̀тə не мо̀əд дə рəстъ̀т

37 (c) [2:48]       ѝскə усло̀виа и туга̀ə ги пу̀снə и кəт сə зəпло̀д’əт уфцѐте̇ вѐче̇

38 (c) [2:57]       през зѝмəтə тѐ по̀чвəд дə сə а̀гн’əт туга̀ва на два̀есе и фто̀ри ма̀рт

39 (c) [3:01]       по̀чвəд дə сə а̀гн’əт па̀к сме нə куша̀рəтə ги иска̀рвəме та̀м

40 (c) [3:06]       и пəс’ѐм ги та̀м а̀гəнца̀тə уфцѐти но̀с’əт ни хл’а̀п та̀м прибѝрəт

41 (c) [3:14]       ко̀ледə нə герг’о̀вден тр’а̀вə дə зəко̀лим а̀гəнце тува̀ бѐше зəко̀н туга̀вə

42 (c) [3:18]       зə сѐл’əните дѐ на̀й ху̀бəвуту а̀гне сəс нə герг’о̀вден же до̀əт

43 (c) [3:23]       ше гу з’ѐмəт та̀м бра̀тт’ə ми по̀ гул’а̀мити и ка̀рəт

44 (c) [3:28]       зəко̀л’əд гу пра̀əд гу ц’а̀лу гу печа̀ə вəф фу̀рни

45 (c) [3:31]       ѝмəше с’ѐлски фу̀рни тəкѝва та̀м пу зə н’а̀кулку кумшѝи сə зберъ̀т

46 (c) [3:37]       и гу нəпъ̀лн’əт а̀гнету кəту гу удеръ̀т са̀му му изва̀д’əд дребулѝити удвъ̀тре

47 (c) [3:42]       дру̀гуту гу пъ̀лнеа та̀м сəс урѝс сəс на̀й рəзлѝчни ра̀бути та̀м

48 (c) [3:46]       сəс перца̀ ли с кəкво̀ту штѐ дə е и гу сла̀гəт

49 (c) [3:49]       зəшѝйəд гу па̀к и гу сла̀гəə вəф фу̀рнəтə дə сə упичѐ

50 (c) [3:53]       и нə герг’о̀вден ц’а̀луту с’ѐлу сə сəбѝрə:ме̇ нə плушта̀т

51 (c) [4:03]       ѝмə идѝн гул’а̀м плушта̀т ц’а̀луту с’ѐлу та̀м сə сəбѝрəт но̀с’əт а̀гнеа̀тə

52 (c) [4:03]       ц’а̀л:те а̀гнетə ги но̀с’əт та̀м и по̀пə мѝни и ги уп’а̀вə

53 (c) [4:08]       нəр’ѐт сѝчки ги уп’а̀вə нəръ̀с’увə ги та̀м и ги уп’а̀вə

54 (c) [4:12]       и сѝчкити му да̀вəт пу ино̀ пəрчѐ нə по̀пə

55 (d) [4:14]       и сѝчкити му да̀вəт пу ино̀ пəрчѐ нə по̀пə

56 (c) [4:16]       еми кəту мѝни по̀пə упѐи ə а̀гнеа̀тə дъ̀т му пу ино̀ пəрчѐ сѝчки

57 (c) [4:22]       нə по̀пə и дру̀гити по̀чнəт ха̀пнəт та̀м сѝчкити и по̀чвəт вѐчи висилбѝти

58 (c) [4:29]       му̀зикə ѝмə свѝр’əт игра̀йəт хура̀ туга̀ə тəнцу̀вəне н’а̀мəше кво̀т сега̀

59 (c) [4:35]       тѐə ра̀бути та̀нци ма̀нци тəку̀у н’а̀мə са̀му хура̀ рəчинѝци пра̀и хура̀

60 (c) [4:39]       е тва̀ сə игра̀еше нə врѐмету ду вичиртъ̀ та̀ə висилба̀

61 (c) [4:43]       бѐше̇ ду вечертъ̀ и вичиртъ̀ сə прибѝрəт о̀рəтə сѐки ф къ̀шти си

62 (KK)       [А Гергьовден какъв праздник беше?]

63 (c) [4:48]       еми пра̀əт герг’о̀вден бѐше пра̀зник нə чуба̀ нə уфча̀р’ə

64 (c) [4:52]       илѝ нə пəстѝр’ə дѐ дѐту̭ гу то̀й с’а̀ да̀же гу иска̀рвəт

65 (c) [4:56]       и та̀м нə светѝ г’о̀рги пра̀зник əмə и сəбѝрəт сə та̀м хо̀рəтə

66 (c) [5:02]       идъ̀т и пѝйəт игра̀йəт хура̀ рəченѝци ду вичиртъ̀ и вичиртъ̀ вѐче

67 (c) [5:08]       кəт сə мръ̀кни сѝчку сə прибѝрə шо̀т туга̀ə н’амəше̭ тəкѝи но̀шни ра̀бути

68 (c) [5:11]       дə хо̀д’əт ѐ пу ц’а̀лə вѐчир мла̀ди н’а̀мə тəкъ̀вə ра̀бут

69 (c) [5:14]       сѝчку сə прибѝрə ф къ̀шти̭

70 (KK)       [Какво правите, когато започнат да се раждат агнетата?]

71 (c) [5:16]       то̀ кəту по̀чни дə сə а̀гни фс’а̀кə уфца̀ до̀лу го̀ри и зна̀м

72 (c) [5:20]       ə да̀ттə куга̀ту е умъ̀рленə и кə ко̀й дѐн тр’а̀вə сə уа̀гни

73 (c) [5:24]       и гə нəбл’уда̀вəме̇ и кəту до̀е врѐме та̀м пу пумо̀гнем и

74 (c) [5:28]       уа̀гни сə ту̀рим дѐм нə а̀гниту дə си су̀чи

75 (c) [5:33]       на̀й нəпрѐд дə зəсу̀чи ху̀бəвичку нə н’а̀куи ѐ

76 (c) [5:35]       тəкѝвə се а̀гн’əт по̀ умəрлу̀шени не сѝ не ѝскəд дə су̀чəт

77 (c) [5:40]       əмə нѝй ги пумъ̀чим та̀м пун’а̀у ку нѐ су̀чи ли ти сə

78 (c) [5:44]       дəдѐм с лəжѝчкə мл’а̀ку са̀му и са̀му дə гу путсѝлим

79 (c) [5:46]       и дə мо̀и вѐч кəт сə сəвзѐми и дə по̀чне

80 (c) [5:50]       дə си су̀чи сəмо̀ и си вəрѝ пудир ма̀йкəтə и су̀чи си

81 (KK)       [Какво правите, когато агнетата започнат да растат?]

82 (c) [5:55]       ѐ кəту пура̀снəт а̀гəнца̀тə вѐче зə уфц’ѐти ги иска̀рвəме вѐчи

83 (c) [6:02]       нə но̀шну врѐми дə ги пəсѐм а̀гнеа̀тə ги удлъ̀чим и ги удбѝвəме̇

84 (c) [6:06]       дə дə н су̀чəт вѐчи по̀чвəме дə дуѝм ма̀йките им

85 (c) [6:15]       мл’а̀куту нəлѝ нəпра̀им сѝрни дə йəде̇̀м мл’а̀ку кѝселу пр’а̀сну

86 (c) [6:15]       и уфцѐти о̀де:ме но̀шну врѐми дə ги пəсѐм туга̀ə

87 (c) [6:19]       слъ̀нцету за̀йдувə нѝе ги иска̀рвəме

88 (KK)       ц’а̀ла вѐчер

89 (c) [6:27]       ц’а̀лə вѐчер ду сəба̀:лəм сəба̀:лəм нəпечѐ ли слъ̀нциту тѐ тр’а̀вə сə прибѝрəт

90 (c) [6:27]       вəф куша̀рəтə па̀г ги издуѝм и нѝе л’а̀гəме дə спѝм

91 (c) [6:30]       и т’ѐ лежъ̀т ц’а̀л дѐн и дру̀гəтə вѐчир па̀к съ̀штə ра̀бут

92 (c) [6:33]       сə пуфта̀р’ə дѐ тəка̀ си ги пəс’а̀hме̇ уфцѐти туга̀ə н’а̀мəши кəт сиа̀

93 (c) [6:37]       приз денъ̀ дə ги пəсъ̀т туга̀ə вѐчер са̀му вѐчер

94 (c) [6:40]       пичѐ ли слъ̀нци уфца̀ ни пəсѐш

95 (KK)       каквѝ бо̀лести и ли ку е ѝмало по офцѐте и ка̀к сте ги леку̀вали

96 (c) [6:47]       еми тува̀ бѐши булестъ̀ зə тува̀ зə митѝлə туга̀ə и зəхра̀нвəме

97 (c) [6:52]       ка̀звəме гу зəhра̀ним ги да̀вəми им тə ц’а̀лə сѝчките о̀рə

98 (c) [6:55]       тува̀ бѐши зəко̀н зѝмəми им ха̀пуви ут витирина̀рнити лѐкəри и ги да̀вəме

99 (c) [7:02]       кəту им дидѐм ду вичиртъ̀ ни гѝ пу̀скəме дə пəсъ̀т

100 (c) [7:06]       нəпрѝмер дн’ѐскə сутринтъ̀ дəдѐм ха̀пувити ду вичиртъ̀ не гѝ пу̀скəме дə пəсъ̀т

101 (KK)       а с кво̀ сте са облѝчали офча̀рското облекло̀ какво̀ е

102 (c) [7:14]       уфча̀рскуту убликло̀

103 (d) [7:16]       пату̀ри

104 (c) [7:16]       цəрву̀ли свѝнски цəрву̀ли бѐли на̀вуштə чѐрни вървѝ нəвѝти тəка̀ ѐ ту̀кə

105 (c) [7:24]       и нə кръ̀з ги пра̀име н’а̀куку пъ̀ти əми бѐли чѐрни връ̀фки на̀вуштə та̀м

106 (c) [7:36]       цəрву̀ли тува̀ сəс пату̀ри о̀дехме по̀йəс зəвѝт ѐ гул’а̀м по̀йəс укулу кръ̀ста

107 (c) [7:36]       убл’а̀кəни здра̀ву што̀ту нə къ̀рə мо̀и тə фа̀ни и дъ̀ш

108 (c) [7:40]       мо̀и тə фа̀ни и студѐну сѝчку и имəми гул’а̀ми йəмурлу̀ци му вѝка:ми

109 (c) [7:46]       тəкъ̀у кəчу̀лкə əмə нѝе му вѝкəми йəмурлу̀к ут тва̀ ту̀рскə ду̀мə

110 (c) [7:51]       тува̀ йəмурлу̀к изглѐждə ѐ т’а̀ тə зəвѝвə сəс н’ѐгə ц’а̀лу

111 (c) [7:55]       сəс кəчу̀лəтə нə глəвъ̀тə утпрѐде кəт сə зəвѝйш и то̀пли мно̀гу

112 (c) [8.00]       тѝə б’а̀ə ва̀л’əни туга̀вə и ва̀л’əə и ста̀вə дибѐл плəтъ̀

113 (c) [8:05]       и ни прупу̀скə и дъ̀ш не прупу̀скə и в’а̀тəр

114 (KK)       [Какви овце отглеждахте?]

115 (c) [8:08]       м’ѐснə пуро̀дə уфцѐ туга̀ва си б’а̀а бəлка̀нски уфцѐ на̀ши си̭

116 (c) [8:13]       б’а̀ə сѐ тəкѝвə дъ̀лга въ̀лна о̀стрə въ̀лнə и т’а̀

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Comments and questions may be addressed to bdlt@berkeley.edu.

Recommended Model for Citations

Bulgarian Dialectology as Living Tradition [2016] (http://www.bulgariandialectology.org, visited on 1 March 2016)
Babjak 1: 13-15. In: Bulgarian Dialectology as Living Tradition [2016] (http://www.bulgariandialectology.org, visited on 1 March 2016)

Text | by Dr. Radut