Srebŭrna 2

1 (RA)       And when you used to have sheep, did you do the shearing?

and
when rel have 2pl impf I sheep pl f
hes
shear 2sg pres I
interr clt
acc 3pl clt

2 (c) [0:03]      Yes, people shear [them], but in the old days wool brought a good price, you know!

yes
acc refl clt
shear 3pl pres I but
at
time sg n def sheep pl f def wool sg f def 3sg impf cop expensive sg f adj adrs

3 (c) [0:07]      Now a kilo of wool [only] brings you fifty stotinkas.

now adv one sg n adj kilo sg n wool sg f
comp
sell 2sg pres P
for
fifty stotinka pl f

4 (RA)       Really?

thus adv
interr clt

5 (c) [0:11]      Only that.

so much adv

6 (RA)       Hmm.

bkch

7 (c) [0:12]      They don’t pay anything for it. These Turks come through here and call out,

nothing sg n neg
acc f 3sg clt
take 3pl pres I Turk pl m def pass 3pl pres I by.here adv
and
call 3pl pres I

8 (c) [0:17]      “Hey there, we buy wool! Wool! We buy walnuts!” but they don’t pay anything for it,

hort wool sg f wool sg f take 1pl pres I walnut pl m take 1pl pres I
and
nothing sg n neg
acc f 3sg clt
pay 3pl pres I

9 (c) [0:18]      whereas before …

but before adv

10 (RA)       Mmm.

bkch

11 (c) [0:21]      … it seemed to me that money was worth more. How much was it then? Five levs?

dat 1sg clt
acc refl clt
seem 3sg pres I money sg f def interr clt 3sg impf cop more much adv what sg n interr 3sg impf cop five lev ct m

12 (c) [0:25]      But now five levs are worth only fifty stotinkas, right? Well, I tell you, that’s a disgrace.

but now adv five lev ct m fifty stotinka pl f interr clt
3pl pres cop clt
adrs
disc shame sg f

13 (RA)       Mm. Umhm.

bkch

14 (c) [0:29]      And as for processing the wool, well there’s nobody to do that now,

and
what sg n interr
acc f 3sg clt
process 3sg pres I and now adv pres neg exist which sg m interr
comp
acc f 3sg clt
process 3sg pres I
interr clt

15 (c) [0:33]      and I guess that’s why people here have already quit keeping sheep –

what sg n interr ost
from
this sg n adj people pl def already adv
acc refl clt
refuse 3sg aor I
from
this pl adj sheep pl f

16 (c) [0:36]      because nobody pays anything for the wool.

because nothing sg n
neg
pay 3pl pres I wool sg f def

17 (RA)       Mmm.

bkch

18 (c) [0:38]      But us simple country folk, we’ve grown up with these woolen socks,

but
disc nom 1pl villager pl m def learn pl P.part P with
woolen pl adj sock pl m

19 (RA)       Yes.

yes

20 (c) [0:41]      and woolen vests,

woolen pl adj vest pl n

21 (RA)       Yes, yes.

yes
yes

22 (c) [0:43]      and we wear them here. None now though, and no machines or whatever to process it.

and
wear 1pl pres I here adv
and
now adv pres neg exist machine pl f
interr clt
pres neg exist
comp
acc f 3sg clt
process 3pl pres I

23 (c) [0:47]      It’s [all] very cheap now, they pay – let’s say they pay [the shepherd] two levs per

very adv cheap adv
and
and pay 3pl pres I pay 3pl pres I
comp
say 1pl pres P
by
two lev ct m

24 (c) [0:52]      sheep these days. And the shepherd tends [all] the sheep, and milks them down there

on
head sg f now adv
acc 3pl clt
pasture 3sg pres I shepherd sg m def
and
acc 3pl clt
milk 3sg pres I there adv down adv

25 (c) [0:57]      by the well. And then he lines them up so they are arranged [according to]

by well sg f def
and
acc 3pl clt
arrange 3sg pres I later adv
under
row sg m there adv
comp
3sg pres cop clt

26 (c) [1:01]      whose turn it is, when each one’s turn comes, how many sheep each one has,

who sg m rel when rel
dat m 3sg clt
3sg pres cop clt
row sg m def
and
how.many rel adv sheep pl f have 3sg pres I

27 (c) [1:04]      and [then] he gives each person the milk per [from his] sheep. So, I mean,

and
dat 3pl clt
give 3sg pres I milk sg n def
by
sheep sg f that.is adv
comp
say 1pl pres P

28 (c) [1:07]      if someone has two sheep, then it’s four. Two kilos per [sheep], that’s how much it is,

if conj
have 3sg pres I two f sheep pl f four
by
two n kilo pl n
interr clt
how.much interr
3pl pres cop clt

29 (c) [1:11]      so he’ll give him four kilos. All of them go by turns, and then they do it again.

four kilo pl n fut
dat m 3sg clt
give 3pl pres P pass 3pl pres I
dat refl clt
all pl def adj row sg m def again adv repeat 3pl pres I

30 (c) [1:16]      Sheep give better milk, [you know]. In those years I had two sheep,

and
sheep sg f def more nice sg n adj milk sg n have 3sg pres I nom 1sg to that pl adj year pl f have 1sg impf sheep pl f two f

31 (c) [1:22]      and a goat – when I milked [it] I’d mix [it with sheep’s milk]. It’s different, [they] say.

and
goat sg f def when conj milk 1sg pres P when conj mix 1sg pres P
dat refl clt
3sg pres cop clt
more other sg n adj say 3sg pres I

32 (RA)       Umhm.

bkch

33 (c) [1:25]      But now that we don’t have [sheep] – Still I’m happy with goat’s [milk],

but now adv when conj not.have 1pl pres I but
hes
1sg pres cop clt content sg f adj
and
from
goat's sg def adj

34 (c) [1:28]      I won’t say no [to it], I don’t seem to be the working type,

and
neg
can 1sg pres I
comp
refuse 1sg pres P
dat 1sg clt
weigh 3sg pres I as.if adv
comp
work 1sg pres I

35 (c) [1:28]      but I like to eat milk. You can make from it white cheese, curds, you know –

and
but
dat 1sg clt
acc refl clt
eat 3sg pres I milk sg n
and
cheese sg n
and
curds sg f disc become 3sg pres I

36 (c) [1:36]      [you can make] everything from it. Like now, when I invite this granddaughter who’s from Sofia

and
everything sg n adj become 3sg pres I
disc
disc
now adv invite 1sg pres I this sg f adj granddaughter sg f rel
from
Sofia sg f place

37 (c) [1:40]      I say “Dragomira, should I serve tomatoes, should I serve some meat [dish]?”

adrs Dragomira sg f name
comp
put 1sg pres P call 1sg pres I tomato pl m
comp
put 1sg pres P something sg n meat sg n

38 (c) [1:45]      "Ah, mother gives us – we make do with cheese and tomatoes.”

excl
nom 1pl mother sg f give 3sg pres I manage 1pl pres I
on
cheese sg n
and
on
tomato pl m

39 (c) [1:48]      [Over there] they buy cheese and tomatoes, lighter fare.

dat refl clt buy 3pl pres I cheese sg n
and
tomato pl m more light sg n adj food sg n

40 (RA)       Mmhm.

bkch

41 (c) [1:51]      And so, thus. That’s how we do it.

and
and
thus adv such sg n adj do 1pl pres I

42 (RA)       What was it like in the olden days? How did you, um,

and
but
one sg n adj time sg n how interr
hes
how interr 3sg impf cop how interr
hes

43 (RA)       shear a sheep, and what did you do with the wool?

shear 2sg pres I
hes
sheep sg f def
and
what sg n interr do 2sg pres I with
wool sg f def

44 (c) [2:01]      We scald the wool.

wool sg f def acc f 3sg clt scald 1pl pres I

45 (RA)       Uh huh –

bkch

46 (c) [2:02]      We scald it, and make it up into dowry [items]. What can I tell you?

and
acc f 3sg clt scald 1pl pres I
and
make 1pl pres I dowry sg m nom 1sg what sg n interr
dat 2sg clt
say 1pl pres I when conj

47 (RA)       Eh?

Ah

48 (c) [2:06]      When you make a betrothal you have to have quilts, about ten quilts layered in a pile,

make 1pl pres P betrothal pl f must pres I imprs
comp
pres exist quilt sg m there adv
by
ten quilt ct m thus adv disc

49 (RA)       Eh [yes].

bkch

50 (c) [2:11]      and then between each [quilt and the next] one we put a pillow, so when you go [to the new place]

and
among
by
one sg f adj pillow sg f put 1pl pres I thus adv
and
nom 2sg when conj go 2sg pres P

51 (c) [2:16]      there’s no way these bed coverings will get worn out. But it was a big, big job.

disc nothing sg n thick.blanket pl m
neg
acc refl clt tear 3sg pres I but big sg f adj big sg f adj toil sg f
3sg pres aux clt
be sg n L.part

52 (RA)       Uh huh.

bkch

53 (c) [2:22]      You shear this sheep, you boil water and pour it [into pots], you go

shear 2sg pres I
acc f 3sg clt
this sg f adj sheep sg f boil 2sg pres I water sg f
and
pour 2sg pres I go 2sg pres I

54 (c) [2:26]      to the well to wash the wool, then you go back, then you card it –

to
well sg f def
comp
acc f 3sg clt
wash 2sg pres I
acc refl clt
return 2sg pres I and
acc f 3sg clt
card 2sg pres I

55 (c) [2:29]      you dry it and then you card it.

acc f 3sg clt
dry 2sg pres I
and
acc f 3sg clt
card 2sg pres I

56 (RA)       Eh, hah.

disc
disc

57 (c) [2:31]      And then –

and
later adv

58 (RA)       Using what?

with
with
what sg n interr

59 (c) [2:32]      You card it with your hand!

with
hand sg f def card 2sg pres I

60 (RA)       Uh huh.

bkch

61 (c) [2:34]      Or you go and – there used to be carders, there are carders –

and
go 2sg pres I and impf exist carder pl m pres exist carder pl m

62 (c) [2:38]      there’s one in Aydemir now, they charge one lev fifty per kilo

now adv
in
Aydemir sg m place pres exist take 3pl pres I
dat 2sg clt
on
one sg n adj kilo sg n one sg m adj
and
fifty

63 (c) [2:42]      to do this for you, as they say, to comb it.

comp
dat 2sg clt
acc f 3sg clt
comp
dat 2sg clt
acc f 3sg clt
comb 3sg pres I
acc refl clt
say 3sg pres I

64 (c)       Uh huh, uh huh.

bkch
bkch

65 (c) [2:44]      But if you do it by hand, you scald it, wash it,

and
nom 2sg with
hand sg f def
dat refl clt
acc f 3sg clt
scald 2sg pres I
dat refl clt
acc f 3sg clt
wash 2sg pres I

66 (c) [2:47]      and card it, and go to comb it out. Then you spin it –

and
acc f 3sg clt
card 2sg pres I
and
go 2sg pres I
comp
acc f 3sg clt
comb 2sg pres I
and
later adv spin 2sg pres I disc

67 (c) [2:50]      on a distaff. We put it like this on the distaff.

on
distaff sg f put 1pl pres I thus adv
on
distaff sg f def

68 (RA)       Yes, yes.

yes
yes

69 (c) [2:53]      Here, [this is where] we put the distaff.

here adv distaff f put 1pl pres I

70 (RA)       You put it here?

here adv
interr clt
put 2sg pres I

71 (c) [2:54]      Yes, yes.

yes yes

72 (RA)       And how do you do [the spinning]?

and
how interr
acc refl clt
do 3sg pres I

73 (c) [2:56]      And you spin there

and
spin 2sg pres I there adv
disc

74 (RA)       Uh huh, uh huh.

bkch bkch

75 (c) [2:57]      [with your] fingers. These fingers of ours know how to do spinning already.

finger pl m def this pl adj our pl def adj finger pl m know 3pl pres I already adv
comp
spin 3pl pres I

76 (RA)       [laughter]

77 (c) [3:00]      [Yes,] our fingers know how to spin. And if you –

know 3pl pres I
comp
spin 3pl pres I our pl def adj finger pl m
and
and
nom 2sg

78 (RA)       And have you done [a lot of] spinning?

and
nom 2sg spin sg f L.part I
interr clt
2sg pres aux clt

79 (c) [3:04]      I did, of course. How could I not have done [spinning],

do 1sg impf I
adrs
how interr
comp
neg
1sg pres aux clt do sg f L.part I

80 (RA)       Ah.

bkch

81 (c) [3:06]      since I’ve married off children, as they say –

disc nom 1sg 1sg pres aux clt marry sg f L.part P child pl n when conj call 3pl pres I

82 (RA)       [laughter]

83 (c) [3:08]      Let me tell you, I put twelve kilos of wool [into the dowry]

comp
dat 2sg clt
say 1sg pres P twelve kilo pl n wool sg f 1sg pres aux clt put sg f L.part P

84 (c) [3:10]      of one granddaughter, and twelve kilos for the other.

of
one sg f def adj granddaughter sg f
and
of
other sg f def adj twelve kilo pl n

85 (RA)       Ooh!

disc

86 (c) [3:12]      Do the math – I [had] to make them kilims [to cover all]

do sg imv I account sg f carpet sg m
comp
dat 3pl clt
make 1sg pres I
for

87 (RA)       Yes.

disc

88 (c) [3:15]      the floors in [apartments] in the apartment complexes.

for
floor pl m def
for
аpartment.building pl m def

89 (RA)       All of it?

all sg n

90 (c) [3:17]      Yes.

yes

91 (RA)       You [did] everything?

all sg n
2sg pres aux clt
nom 2sg

92 (c) [3:19]      Yes, I [did]. Well I didn’t make everything [myself]. I took it –

nom 1sg
disc
nom 1sg no nom 1sg
hes
acc n 3sg clt
make 1sg pres I
acc n 3sg clt
carry 1sg pres I

93 (c) [3:22]      there was this factory, you know –

impf exist interr exist impf factory sg f

94 (RA)       Ah, right.

disc
thus adv

95 (c) [3:24]      in town. We give them an order and pay for it

in
city sg m def give 1pl pres I order sg f but pay 1sg pres I
acc n 3sg clt

96 (RA)       Aha, aha.

bkch

97 (c) [3:26]      after they make it up for me. But [yes], we did our own weaving in the village.

nom 3pl when conj
dat 1sg clt
acc m 3sg clt
process 3pl pres P but
and
1pl pres aux clt weave pl L.part I
in
village sg n

98 (c) [3:30]      Oh my, [what we did!] We’d get together and make a – we call it at that time

excl disc
acc refl clt
gather 1pl pres I make 1pl pres I one sg n adj
hes
dat n 3sg clt
say 1pl pres I acc n 3sg time sg n

99 (c) [3:36]      [weaving] with reeds. You pick [reeds left behind] after others, and weave on the loom.

with
reed pl m def remove 2sg pres I after other sg f adj
on
loom sg m def weave 2sg pres I

100 (c) [3:40]      What do these young people know now? They know nothing! No looms, no nothing.

now adv what sg n interr know 3pl pres I this pl adj young pl def adj nothing sg n
neg
know 3pl pres I pres neg exist loom sg m pres neg exist nothing sg n

101 (RA)       And you had a hand loom?

and
nom 2sg
2sg pres aux clt
have sg f L.part I loom sg m

102 (c) [3:46]      Yes, of course, and so much –

excl
disc
disc
how interr
disc
how.much interr

103 (RA)       So you used to weave a lot?

and
weave sg f L.part I
2sg pres aux clt
much adv

104 (c) [3:48]      Ah, [I can’t count] how many rugs I’ve woven, these

yes
disc
how.many adv rug pl f 1sg pres aux clt weave sg f L.part P such pl adj

105 (RA)       Uh huh.

bkch

106 (c) [3:50]      village rugs where

village pl adj [...]
rug pl f rel

107 (RA)       Yes, yes.

yes
yes

108 (c) [3:53]      I tore up and got rags that I took from here and there, I tore them up

1sg pres aux clt tear sg f L.part I carry sg f L.part I rag pl m
1sg pres aux clt
take sg f L.part I from.there adv
1sg pres aux clt
acc 3pl clt
tear sg f L.part I

109 (c) [3:57]      and wove them [into rugs]. What can I say?

1sg pres aux clt
acc 3pl clt
weave sg f L.part I what sg n interr
comp
dat 2sg clt
say 1sg pres P

110 (RA)       Well, tell me what it’s like with the loom –

disc tell sg imv P
dat 1sg clt
how interr
3sg pres cop clt
with
with
loom sg m def

111 (c) [4:02]      The loom?

loom sg m def

112 (RA)       because I’ve heard about them but I’ve never seen one, I don’t know

because 1sg pres aux clt hear sg f L.part I
but
[…]
neg
1sg pres aux clt see sg f L.part I
neg
neg
know 1sg pres I

113 (RA)       what all the various – different …

what.kind pl adj
3pl pres cop clt
various pl adj different pl adj

114 (c) [4:07]      Well, listen [then]. It –

listen sg imv I disc

115 (RA)       … parts [of it] are, [or] how it all works.

part pl f how interr
acc refl clt
do 3sg pres I

116 (c) [4:08]      It works with these two [pieces of] wood, let’s call them.

disc
acc refl clt
do 3sg pres I with
two n wood pl n
comp
say 1pl pres P

117 (RA)       Uh huh

bkch

118 (c) [4:10]      Like a loom is now, there’s this – how did they call it?

thus adv as
3sg pres cop clt
loom sg m def now adv pres exist such sg n adj how interr
dat n 3sg clt
say 3pl impf I nom 3pl

119 (c) [4:15]      I’ve started to forget [these things – ah, yes,] we call it a beam.

take 1sg aor P
comp
forget 1sg pres I
and
nom 1sg already adv beam sg n
dat n 3sg clt
say 1pl pres I

120 (c)       Ah –

bkch

121 (c) [4:19]      A beam ...

one sg n adj beam sg n

122 (RA)       Aha.

bkch

123 (c) [4:20]      … at the outer edge that we weave [onto]. [For] this beam, one of us buys the yarn.

and
out adv this sg f adj rel fut
acc n 3sg clt
weave 1pl pres I this sg n adj beam sg n buy 1pl pres I who sg m interr yarn sg f def

124 (c) [4:26]      And we have [these] spinning wheels, we wind [the yarn] onto spools.

and
have 1pl pres I spinning.wheel pl m this pl adj spinning.wheel pl m
acc 3pl clt
hes
wind 1pl pres I
on
spool pl m

125 (RA)       Umhm.

bkch

126 (c) [4:31]      And then we suspend some sticks, let’s say [there’s] one stick here,

later adv again adv hang 1pl pres I one pl adj stick pl f
comp
say 1pl pres P there adv one sg f adj stick sg f

127 (c) [4:34]      one there – you figure out how many meters [of rug] you can –

there adv one sg f adj
dat refl clt
make 2sg pres I account sg f how.many interr meter ct m can pres imprs
comp
dat 2sg clt
3sg pres cop clt

128 (c) [4:37]      that you’d need for one room. And then we warp [the loom], as we say.

comp
dat 2sg clt
need pres I imprs acc 2sg
for
one sg f adj room sg f
and
acc n 3sg clt
warp 1pl pres I
dat n 3sg clt
say 1pl pres I

129 (RA)       Umhm

bkch

130 (c) [4:42]      We warp this thing. After we warp it, then we put the skeins on.

warp 1pl pres P this sg n adj thing sg n when conj
acc m 3sg clt
warp 1pl pres P later adv put 1pl pres I skein pl f

131 (c) [4:47]      You’ve got one skein [here], and then another – one below and one on top.

and
this sg f skein sg f one sg n def adj thus adv other sg n def adj down adv one sg n def adj above adv

132 (c) [4:51]      And these reeds – they go here, see, and that’s how you keep [the two skeins] apart.

and
this pl adj reed pl m thus adv stand 3pl pres I disc
here adv
and
from
acc n 3sg
acc n 3sg clt
remove 1pl pres I

133 (c) [4:57]      And then, these reeds direct it from below.

and
later adv this pl adj reed pl m
acc n 3sg clt
direct 3pl pres I below adv

134 (c) [5:01]      And [with] another woman we turn [the beam]. The other one is over there and

and
other sg f adj woman sg f again adv wind 1pl pres I other sg f def adj
ost
there adv nom 1sg here adv

135 (c) [5:06]      I am here with these spindles, and we roll it up [the fabric] onto this beam,

nom 1sg with
one pl adj spindle pl n
acc n 3sg clt
wind 1pl pres I
on
this sg n adj beam sg n

137 (c) [5:09]      and we keep on going until it’s all [rolled up], up to here. Then we put it

and
nom n 3sg come sg imv I come sg imv I everything sg n def adj
to
here adv
and
then adv
acc n 3sg clt
put 1pl pres I

138 (c) [5:12]      on this loom. The loom itself is like this, this wide.

on
this sg m adj loom sg m this sg m adj loom sg m thus adv
dat refl clt
3sg pres cop clt
ost
so.much sg m adj thus adv
3sg pres cop clt
wide sg m adj

139 (RA)       Umhm.

bkch

140 (c) [5:16]      Here there’s a cross – a trou– , this thing – [wait] now

here adv pres exist one sg n adj cross sg m def one sg n adj [...]
hes
disc
disc
now adv

141 (c) [5:20]      until I can say it – There are these cross-like handles on the beam,

unit
acc n 3sg clt
say 1sg pres P again adv thus adv
on
cross sg m def dat 2sg clt where rel
3sg pres cop clt
beam sg n def

142 (RA)       Umhm.

bkch

143 (c) [5:26]      and that’s how you make it go, and over on the side there are some sticks.

from
acc m 3sg
acc n 3sg clt
direct 2sg pres I
on
this sg f adj side sg f pres exist one pl adj stick pl f

144 (c) [5:29]      These sticks keep up the tension. When you finish weaving one thing you start another.

one pl adj stick pl f stretch 3pl pres I when conj
acc n 3sg clt
weave 2sg pres P this sg n adj thing sg n begin 2sg pres I other sg n adj

145 (c) [5:35]      And there’s a “chumbar” (temple), as we call it. You put it there

and
and
pres exist
and
temple sg m
dat m 3sg clt
say 1pl pres I temple sg m
and
thus adv
acc n 3sg clt
put 2sg pres I

146 (c) [5:38]      and stretch this thing [you’re weaving]. If it’s not kept stretched out it will shrink.

stretch 2sg pres I
this sg n adj
thing sg n
if conj
neg
3sg pres cop clt
stretch sg n P.part P disc fut
acc refl clt
condense 3sg pres P

147 (RA)       Umhm.

bkch

148 (c) [5:42]      And when you stretch it out then it gets, as they say,

and
disc when conj
acc m 3sg clt
stretch 2sg pres P
and
nom n 3sg become 3sg pres I thus adv as call 3pl pres I

149 (c) [5:46]      stretched out straight. Oh – [who knows] how many rugs [I’ve woven],

as stretch sg n P.part P
and
straight sg n adj but how.many interr rug pl f

150 (c) [5:49]      or who will use them up? What can I tell you?

and
which sg m interr
fut
acc 3pl clt
wear.out 3sg pres P
comp
pres neg exist what sg n interr
comp
dat 2sg clt
say 1sg pres P

151 (c) [5:54]      We put – [there’s] all sorts of them on my bed – new ones, nice ones, lousy ones.

put 1pl pres P
on
bed sg n def
dat 1sg clt
and
new pl adj
and
nice pl adj
and
bad pl adj
and
all.kind pl adj

152 (c) [5:59]      And that’s how we used to live in the village.

and
thus adv live 1pl pres I nom 1pl
in
village sg n

153 (RA)       Hm, hm, hm.

bkch

154 (c) [6:01]      Earlier we [had] straw mats because we’re close to the swamp. We have bulrushes here,

straw.mat pl f before adv nom 1pl because
1pl pres cop clt
near adv
to
swamp sg f def here adv have 1pl pres I bulrush sg m

155 (c) [6:05]      [and so] lots of straw mats. That’s how people lived in the old days, with straw mats.

many adv straw.mat pl f people pl def live pl L.part I one sg n adj time sg n but
on
straw.mat sg f def

156 (c) [6:08]      But now there aren’t any straw mats. Now we put floorboards in the rooms,

but
and nom 1pl now adv straw.mat pl f pres neg exist but
and
nom 1pl lay.flooring 1pl pres I room pl f def

157 (c) [6:13]      even in old age we do them up new, [like] the oven room up there.

at
old pl adj
year pl f one pl f def even adv
acc 3pl clt
do 1pl aor P there adv
in
oven.room sg m def

158 (c) [6:17]      We do them up – uh, with plaster. You know how cold it gets!

hes
hes
hes
plaster sg m
acc 3pl clt
do 1pl aor P know 2sg pres I what sg n interr
3sg pres cop clt
cold adv

159 (RA)       Huh.

bkch

160 (c) [6:21]      On your feet. So now there are these boards.

on
foot pl m def and rel
3pl pres cop clt
now adv as
3pl pres cop clt
on
board pl f

161 (c) [6:25]      But back then we put clay on the ground. And you plaster it on higher up [too],

but acc n 3sg time sg n plaster 1pl impf I earth sg f def
and
plaster 2sg pres I above adv

162 (RA)       Oh.

disc

163 (c) [6:29]      let’s say, [to make it] white – the walls [get to be] white,

comp
say 1pl pres P white sg n adj wall sg n def white pl adj

164 (RA)       Hm.

bkch

165 (c) [6:31]      and here below you plaster it with [something] yellow. And then you lay out

here adv below adv with
yellow sg n adj
acc f 3sg clt
plaster 2sg pres I
and
spread 2sg pres I

166 (c) [6:34]      these straw mats. And that’s how we lived, with these straw mats.

this pl adj straw.mat pl f
and
with
this pl adj straw.mat pl f thus adv
1pl pres aux clt
live pl L.part I

167 (c) [6:37]      Because we’re close to the swamp here, we have bulrushes, as …

and
swamp sg f def
dat 1pl clt
here adv because near adv nom 1pl have 1pl pres I bulrush sg m
dat m 3sg clt
acc refl clt

168 (RA)       Um hm.

bkch

169 (c) [6:40]      … we call those things,

dat m 3sg clt
say 1pl pres I
to
this sg n adj thing sg n

170 (RA)       Umhm, umhm.

bkch
bkch

171 (c) [6:42]      and these bulrushes. There was also a loom [out there] so you could weave [the rushes].

and
this sg m adj bullrush sg m again adv
dat refl clt
impf exist loom sg m
comp
acc m 3sg clt
weave 2sg pres I

172 (RA)       Hm.

bkch

173 (c) [6:47]      They did this in the old [days], and [even] now I have a straw mat –

from
old pl def adj this sg n adj thing sg n
acc n 3sg clt
do 3pl impf I and nom 1sg now adv have 1sg pres I one sg f adj straw.mat sg f

174 (c) [6:52]      one upstairs, a narrower one here. They are what’s left. We’re getting rid of the others.

above adv one sg f adj have 1sg pres I more narrow sg f adj this sg n adj remain 3pl aor P this pl adj other pl def adj
acc 3pl clt
discard 1pl pres I nom 1pl

175 (c) [6:56]      But we’re nailing down floorboards in the three rooms upstairs, those all have boards.

but
and
nom 1pl lay.flooring 1pl pres I disc three def
dat 1pl clt
room pl f above adv lay.flooring pl P.part P

176 (c) [6:59]      Downstairs we only put plaster, and then you lay out the rugs, on, you know,

down adv only adv do 1pl pres P with
plaster sg m
and
now adv spread 2sg pres I rug pl f def
comp
say 1pl pres P

177 (c) [7:03]      on the boards. And that’s how it was in the olden days, that’s how we lived,

along
along
board pl f def and thus adv 3sg impf cop one sg n adj time sg n thus adv thus adv
1pl pres aux clt
live pl L.part I

178 (c) [7:08]      like the older [generations] before us had lived, as they say.

but nom 1pl as before acc 1pl old pl def adj
3pl pres aux clt
live pl L.part I as say 3pl pres I

179 (c) [7:12]      My father-in-law always said, “You don’t like [anything] now.”

nom m 3sg my sg m def adj father.in.law sg m all adv say 3sg impf I
disc
nom 2pl now adv
neg
like 2pl pres I

180 (c) [7:15]      In the old days, Mom says, when she made a pan of beans,

one sg n adj time sg n Mom sg f say 3sg pres P when conj boil 3sg pres P one sg f adj pot sg f beans sg m

181 (c) [7:18]      one of those big copper pans, we would eat that for an entire week, these beans.

and
nom f 3sg copper sg f adj pot sg f entire sg f adj week sg f eat 1pl pres I say 3sg pres I acc m 3sg beans sg m

182 (c) [7:21]      And they weren’t fried or anything. But now even we have gotten soft.

and
nom m 3sg neither fried sg m P.part P neither nothing sg n but now adv
acc refl clt
coddle 1pl aor P
and
nom 1pl

183 (c) [7:24]      But the young people now are even more spoiled. So – that’s how it was.

but young pl def adj now adv disc still adv more coddle pl P.part P
and
thus adv such sg n adj 3sg impf cop

         And when you used to have sheep, did you do the shearing?

         Yes, people shear [them], but in the old days wool brought a good price, you know!

         Now a kilo of wool [only] brings you fifty stotinkas.

         Really?

         Only that.

         Hmm.

         They don’t pay anything for it. These Turks come through here and call out,

         “Hey there, we buy wool! Wool! We buy walnuts!” but they don’t pay anything for it,

         whereas before …

         Mmm.

         … it seemed to me that money was worth more. How much was it then? Five levs?

         But now five levs are worth only fifty stotinkas, right? Well, I tell you, that’s a disgrace.

         Mm. Umhm.

         And as for processing the wool, well there’s nobody to do that now,

         and I guess that’s why people here have already quit keeping sheep –

         because nobody pays anything for the wool.

         Mmm.

         But us simple country folk, we’ve grown up with these woolen socks,

         Yes.

         and woolen vests,

         Yes, yes.

         and we wear them here. None now though, and no machines or whatever to process it.

         It’s [all] very cheap now, they pay – let’s say they pay [the shepherd] two levs per

         sheep these days. And the shepherd tends [all] the sheep, and milks them down there

         by the well. And then he lines them up so they are arranged [according to]

         whose turn it is, when each one’s turn comes, how many sheep each one has,

         and [then] he gives each person the milk per [from his] sheep. So, I mean,

         if someone has two sheep, then it’s four. Two kilos per [sheep], that’s how much it is,

         so he’ll give him four kilos. All of them go by turns, and then they do it again.

         Sheep give better milk, [you know]. In those years I had two sheep,

         and a goat – when I milked [it] I’d mix [it with sheep’s milk]. It’s different, [they] say.

         Umhm.

         But now that we don’t have [sheep] – Still I’m happy with goat’s [milk],

         I won’t say no [to it], I don’t seem to be the working type,

         but I like to eat milk. You can make from it white cheese, curds, you know –

         [you can make] everything from it. Like now, when I invite this granddaughter who’s from Sofia

         I say “Dragomira, should I serve tomatoes, should I serve some meat [dish]?”

         "Ah, mother gives us – we make do with cheese and tomatoes.”

         [Over there] they buy cheese and tomatoes, lighter fare.

         Mmhm.

         And so, thus. That’s how we do it.

         What was it like in the olden days? How did you, um,

         shear a sheep, and what did you do with the wool?

         We scald the wool.

         Uh huh –

         We scald it, and make it up into dowry [items]. What can I tell you?

         Eh?

         When you make a betrothal you have to have quilts, about ten quilts layered in a pile,

         Eh [yes].

         and then between each [quilt and the next] one we put a pillow, so when you go [to the new place]

         there’s no way these bed coverings will get worn out. But it was a big, big job.

         Uh huh.

         You shear this sheep, you boil water and pour it [into pots], you go

         to the well to wash the wool, then you go back, then you card it –

         you dry it and then you card it.

         Eh, hah.

         And then –

         Using what?

         You card it with your hand!

         Uh huh.

         Or you go and – there used to be carders, there are carders –

         there’s one in Aydemir now, they charge one lev fifty per kilo

         to do this for you, as they say, to comb it.

         Uh huh, uh huh.

         But if you do it by hand, you scald it, wash it,

         and card it, and go to comb it out. Then you spin it –

         on a distaff. We put it like this on the distaff.

         Yes, yes.

         Here, [this is where] we put the distaff.

         You put it here?

         Yes, yes.

         And how do you do [the spinning]?

         And you spin there

         Uh huh, uh huh.

         [with your] fingers. These fingers of ours know how to do spinning already.

         [laughter]

         [Yes,] our fingers know how to spin. And if you –

         And have you done [a lot of] spinning?

         I did, of course. How could I not have done [spinning],

         Ah.

         since I’ve married off children, as they say –

         [laughter]

         Let me tell you, I put twelve kilos of wool [into the dowry]

         of one granddaughter, and twelve kilos for the other.

         Ooh!

         Do the math – I [had] to make them kilims [to cover all]

         Yes.

         the floors in [apartments] in the apartment complexes.

         All of it?

         Yes.

         You [did] everything?

         Yes, I [did]. Well I didn’t make everything [myself]. I took it –

         there was this factory, you know –

         Ah, right.

         in town. We give them an order and pay for it

         Aha, aha.

         after they make it up for me. But [yes], we did our own weaving in the village.

         Oh my, [what we did!] We’d get together and make a – we call it at that time

         [weaving] with reeds. You pick [reeds left behind] after others, and weave on the loom.

         What do these young people know now? They know nothing! No looms, no nothing.

         And you had a hand loom?

         Yes, of course, and so much –

         So you used to weave a lot?

         Ah, [I can’t count] how many rugs I’ve woven, these

         Uh huh.

         Yes, yes.

         I tore up and got rags that I took from here and there, I tore them up

         and wove them [into rugs]. What can I say?

         Well, tell me what it’s like with the loom –

         The loom?

         because I’ve heard about them but I’ve never seen one, I don’t know

         what all the various – different …

         Well, listen [then]. It –

         … parts [of it] are, [or] how it all works.

         It works with these two [pieces of] wood, let’s call them.

         Uh huh

         Like a loom is now, there’s this – how did they call it?

         I’ve started to forget [these things – ah, yes,] we call it a beam.

         Ah –

         A beam ...

         Aha.

         … at the outer edge that we weave [onto]. [For] this beam, one of us buys the yarn.

         And we have [these] spinning wheels, we wind [the yarn] onto spools.

         Umhm.

         And then we suspend some sticks, let’s say [there’s] one stick here,

         one there – you figure out how many meters [of rug] you can –

         that you’d need for one room. And then we warp [the loom], as we say.

         Umhm

         We warp this thing. After we warp it, then we put the skeins on.

         You’ve got one skein [here], and then another – one below and one on top.

         And these reeds – they go here, see, and that’s how you keep [the two skeins] apart.

         And then, these reeds direct it from below.

         And [with] another woman we turn [the beam]. The other one is over there and

         I am here with these spindles, and we roll it up [the fabric] onto this beam,

         and we keep on going until it’s all [rolled up], up to here. Then we put it

         on this loom. The loom itself is like this, this wide.

         Umhm.

         Here there’s a cross – a trou– , this thing – [wait] now

         until I can say it – There are these cross-like handles on the beam,

         Umhm.

         and that’s how you make it go, and over on the side there are some sticks.

         These sticks keep up the tension. When you finish weaving one thing you start another.

         And there’s a “chumbar” (temple), as we call it. You put it there

         and stretch this thing [you’re weaving]. If it’s not kept stretched out it will shrink.

         Umhm.

         And when you stretch it out then it gets, as they say,

         stretched out straight. Oh – [who knows] how many rugs [I’ve woven],

         or who will use them up? What can I tell you?

         We put – [there’s] all sorts of them on my bed – new ones, nice ones, lousy ones.

         And that’s how we used to live in the village.

         Hm, hm, hm.

         Earlier we [had] straw mats because we’re close to the swamp. We have bulrushes here,

         [and so] lots of straw mats. That’s how people lived in the old days, with straw mats.

         But now there aren’t any straw mats. Now we put floorboards in the rooms,

         even in old age we do them up new, [like] the oven room up there.

         We do them up – uh, with plaster. You know how cold it gets!

         Huh.

         On your feet. So now there are these boards.

         But back then we put clay on the ground. And you plaster it on higher up [too],

         Oh.

         let’s say, [to make it] white – the walls [get to be] white,

         Hm.

         and here below you plaster it with [something] yellow. And then you lay out

         these straw mats. And that’s how we lived, with these straw mats.

         Because we’re close to the swamp here, we have bulrushes, as …

         Um hm.

         … we call those things,

         Umhm, umhm.

         and these bulrushes. There was also a loom [out there] so you could weave [the rushes].

         Hm.

         They did this in the old [days], and [even] now I have a straw mat –

         one upstairs, a narrower one here. They are what’s left. We’re getting rid of the others.

         But we’re nailing down floorboards in the three rooms upstairs, those all have boards.

         Downstairs we only put plaster, and then you lay out the rugs, on, you know,

         on the boards. And that’s how it was in the olden days, that’s how we lived,

         like the older [generations] before us had lived, as they say.

         My father-in-law always said, “You don’t like [anything] now.”

         In the old days, Mom says, when she made a pan of beans,